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sarunas

Mysterium – now on uniswap 🦄

Mysterium integrates UniswapV2 and launches MYST liquidity pool!

Mysterium Network is fast approaching its launch on mainnet. This exciting event will allow all users to pay for privacy services using our native MYST token, which has not had its utility potential unleashed – until now. 

MYST is the token at the heart of Mysterium Network. It acts like digital fuel, serving various functions and bringing different network security and stability functions into Mysterium Network.

As stated in our founding whitepaper, MYST is a utility token. Therefore, providing liquidity for MYST prior to our dVPN launch has not been a focal point for the project. However, we anticipate that purchasing MYST may become a friction point for many new users who are keen to explore and use Mysterium VPN. Most of our users are not crypto-savvy, and may be unsure about where to begin or where to find the token.

Read: Did you know we’re upgrading the MYST token? Learn how to migrate your tokens here.

After collecting responses from a community survey, we learned that half of our current node runners prefer to receive their payments in Ether (ETH). Our survey has also shown considerable demand for payment settlements in Ether or stable coins. This is a feature we will look to implement in the future.

Our main focus is on growing traffic within the network, and in making it more resilient. We want to remove friction in our user journey, first for early adopters who hold crypto, and then to a wider audience. The large community of ETH and other ERC-20 token holders are a natural fit for Mysterium VPN. But they need an easy way to swap for MYST, creating a seamless onboarding experience.

To meet these requirements, Mysterium will be integrated with popular DEX platform Uniswap.

What is Uniswap?

Uniswap is a decentralized exchange. A decentralized exchange (DEX) is a peer to peer marketplace for cryptocurrencies that involves smart contracts instead of traditional third parties, such as brokers. It allows users to trustlessly swap Ethereum-based tokens. You can swap your tokens directly with other tokens supplied by their liquidity pools. 

A platform like Uniswap is just the interface for accessing these liquidity pools. Instead of a traditional order book, Uniswap pools all tokens into smart contracts, and users trade against these liquidity pools. Liquidity pools can be funded by projects or by users themselves, which are often rewarded with a percentage of the fees generated from all trades. Anyone is able to swap tokens, add tokens to a pool, or create a new pool (list a new token) on Uniswap. 

With decentralised exchanges, the process of trading is automated by smart contracts. You don’t have to have an account with the individual DEX platform – you just link your preferred wallet which signs and executes the transactions. 

How will the integration improve your experience?

We have created a liquidity pool for MYST on Uniswap. We’ll then integrate this pool with Mysterium’s backend, so it connects to our payments protocol, Hermes. Hermes is Mysterium’s native payments infrastructure which enables P2P transactions between all users (service providers and their customers).

Our service providers (node runners) will also be able to choose whether their payments are settled in MYST, or swapped directly into ETH, with a click of a button. This can also be done automagically, with settlement features that allows nodes to set certain thresholds which settle automatically when they are met. In the future, DAI will also be available as a payment option.

On the user side, this integration enables us to onboard broader communities into Mysterium Network. New users will be able to send ETH (or an ERC-20 token of their choice) to their Mysterium account, and receive MYST almost instantly to begin paying nodes for their services straight away. This means that a user won’t necessarily need to know what MYST is to use Mysterium Network. 

The MYST community is invited to provide liquidity to the Uniswap pool. This also provides an opportunity to earn a share of all fees from trades made through the Uniswap pool. 

In the future, we plan to integrate with other DEX platforms like Changelly to help connect BTC and other blockchain communities into Mysterium Network.

Ready to dive into MYST liquidity pool?

Excited about Uniswap x MYST? So are we. You’ll be able to provide liquidity yourself or simply swap your ETH for MYST ahead of our launch. 

Mysterium Network wouldn’t exist without its committed community of node runners and users. For this growing community of netizens committed to keeping the internet free, we are endlessly thankful. Interested in helping? Find out how you can run a node.

If you haven’t already, check out Mysterium dVPN available for Windows, Mac and Android. All our client applications are currently in testnet – so are currently free for a limited time. Try them out!

What is P2P (Peer-to-peer) Technology?

What is P2P (Peer-to-peer) technology?

For centuries, human connection has never been a simple equation. 1+1 often equals 3, sometimes more. We had messengers who carried sealed letters, phone operators who connected our calls, and now Internet Service Providers who hook us into a matrix of other businesses, platforms and infrastructure owners just to send a simple email.

Perhaps the most perplexing and inconvenient way of communicating – the singing telegram…

Yet with the dawn of peer-to-peer (P2P) technology, the role of these middlemen (and women) has perhaps become obsolete. 

P2P technology allows 2 devices (and therefore, two people) to communicate directly, without the necessitating a third party to ensure it happens. The technology has often been rejected and buried in the darker corners of our internet, especially as corporations have taken over our communication channels. These businesses have dictated how we connect and communicate with one another for decades. 

But before the internet was ruled by the corporate letheans of today, it was once powered by the people who used it. This P2P internet meant that you and I could connect and communicate with each other directly. The bluetooth in your phone functions similarly to this – you airdrop files directly between devices, with no need for any intermediary to facilitate or even see what files you’re sharing.

Maybe you remember Napster, the file sharing giant which popularized P2P music. While you were downloading and sharing music files from this platform, you were also spreading a new phenomenon which the internet made possible – community-powered, governed and owned technology that stretched into our social and economic realms.

Vintage P2P. A window you recognise, even if you never used it. Source.

But first - what is the client-server model?

The internet that we know today is mostly made up of the client-server model. All machines or devices connected directly to the internet are called servers. Your computer, phone or IoT device is a client that wants to be connected to the web, and a server stores those websites and web content you want to access. Every device, whether client or server, has its own unique “address” (commonly known as your IP address), used to identify the path/route for sending and receiving the files you want to access.

How does the internet work? A look at the client-server model.

Servers store and control all this web information and resources in a centralized way. The biggest and most widely used servers are owned by internet companies like Google, Facebook and Amazon. These servers possess the computing power, memory and storage requirements that can be scaled to global proportions. It also means that a single server can also dictate the consumption and supply of internet resources and websites to clients, like you and me. 

How does P2P work?

Peer-to-peer infrastructure transforms the traditional role of a server. In a P2P system, a web user is both a server and a client, and is instead called a node. 

Related: The ultimate guide to running and earning with a Mysterium node by sharing your bandwidth.

Nodes power the network by sharing their resources such as bandwidth, disc storage and/or processing power. Resources can be shared directly and distributed evenly among all nodes within the network. These sorts of decentralized networks use these shared resources more efficiently than a traditional network as they evenly distribute workloads between all nodes. Together they equally and unanimously power web applications. Because there is no need for a central host or server, these networks are also less vulnerable from a security and network health standpoint, as there is no single point of failure.

What can be P2P?

“Peer-to-Peer mechanisms can be used to access any kind of distributed resources

P2P networks often have characteristics that are missing from the internet today – trustless and permissionless, censorship-resistant, and often with built-in anonymity and privacy.

P2P file sharing – BitTorrent – sync-and-share software which allows users to download “pieces” of files from multiple peers at once to form the entire file. IPFS has also emerged, where users can download as well as host content. There is no central server and each user has a small portion of a data package. IPFS is the evolution in P2P file sharing and functions like BitTorrent and other torrent protocols. IPFS mimics many characteristics of a Blockchain, connecting blocks which use hash-function security. However, IPFS does support file versioning, while blockchain is immutable (permanent).

P2P knowledge – Decentralized Wiki (Dat protocol) an article is hosted by a range of readers instead of one centralised server, making censorship much more difficult. 

P2P money – Bitcoinwhere value is digitised, encrypted and transparent – and as easily transferred as an email. 

P2P computing power – Golemdecentralized supercomputer that anyone can access. It is made up of the combined power of users’ machines.

P2P communicationSignal is perhaps the most popular communication app with end-to-end encryption and architecture mimics P2P tech. Their server architecture was previously federated, and while they rely on centralised servers for encrypted messaging, this facilities the discovery of contacts who are also Signal users and the automatic exchange of users’ public keys. Voice and video calls are P2P however.

Peer-to-peer in many ways is human-to-human. These virtual and collaborative communities hold us accountable to each other and the technology we’re using. They offer us a sense of responsibility and comradeship. They have even been called “egalitarian” networks, as each peer is considered equal, with the same rights and duties as the others. If we’re all helping to keep something sustained – a living digital community where responsibility is equally shared yet belongs to no one – then perhaps we can emulate these same lines of thought beyond our technical networks and into our political and social worlds. Can P2P teach us about purer forms of digital democracy? 

“In peer-to-peer networking, an algorithm in the peer-to-peer communications protocol balances load, and even peers with modest resources can help to share the load.”

Popular P2P Platforms

The theory of P2P network first emerged in 1969 with a publication titled Request for Comments by the Internet Engineering Task Force. A decade later, a dial-up P2P network was launched in 1980 with the introduction of Usenet, a worldwide Internet discussion system. Usenet was the first to operate without a central server or administrator. 

But it wasn’t until 1999, some 20 years later, that a P2P network really proved its potential as a useful, social application. American college student Shawn Fanning launched Napster, the global music-sharing platform which popularised P2P file sharing. Users would search for songs or artists via a centralized index server, which catalogued songs located on every computer’s hard drive connected to the network. Users could download a personal copy while also offering their own stored files.

Napster Super Bowl XXXIX Ad “Do The Math”

Napsters experiential marketing tactics during the 2004 super bowl, when they moved to a paid model. 

Napster was the dawn of P2P networks “as we know them today”, introducing them to the mainstream. It has been suggested that peer-to-peer marketplaces – some of the most disruptive startups to grace the internet – were inspired by the fundamental values and characteristics of Napster. Businesses such as AirBnB and Uber kickstarted the new sharing economy, but sold us the illusion of community. As conglomerates who are simply the middleman between our peer-to-peer transitions, we also become their hired workforces without even realising it. This business model relies upon our supplyint our own homes, cars and time to create the sharnig economy, while they simply facilitate it to happen. 

With P2P systems, we can remove them from the picture altogether. If we decentralize the sharing economy, you become the user, the host and the network itself. As peers, we are incentivised to contribute time, resources or services and are rewarded accordingly, with no one taking a cut. Decentralised P2P networks are transparent, secure and truly community-run systems.

A strange sharing economy infographic by Morgan Stanely, who thinks everything can be shared – including pets? Source.

Jordan Ritter (Napster’s founding architect), was quoted in a Fortune article:

“As technologists, as hackers, we were sharing content, sharing data all the time. If we wanted music… It was still kind of a pain in the ass to get that stuff. So Fanning had a youthful idea: Man, this sucks. I’m bored, and I want to make something that makes this easier.”

Napster soon became the target of a lawsuit for distributing copyrighted music at a large scale, and was consequently shut down just 2 years later. Yet this “clever-if-crude piece of software” demonstrated new possibilities for Internet-based applications, and “transformed the Internet into a maelstrom, definitively proving the web’s power to create and obliterate value…”

Corporate profit, infrastructural control

While digital networking has led to an unprecedented evolution of our social and professional lives, the potential of P2P to power those daily interactions took much of a backseat as the internet started to take off in the early 2000’s. While protocols of the early internet were founded upon decentralized and peer-to-peer mechanisms, centralized alternatives eventually took over.

Related: What does internet censorship look like in 2020. And how can decentralisation change it?

Yet since centralized systems began to plant their roots deep into our internet infrastructure, the web has been slowly rotting away underneath shiny user interfaces and slick graphics. They make the internet less safe, with servers that are routinely hacked. It makes the internet far less private, enabling mass-surveillance conducted by cybercriminals and organisations alike. It makes the internet segregated and broken, rather than unified and democratic, with nations building impenetrable firewalls and cutting off the outside world altogether. 

It’s said that P2P money poses a large threat to governments, who seem concerned that without regulation and oversight, these “anarchist” networks could grow beyond their control. The crackdown on cryptocurrency in countries with rampant human rights violations, corrupt governments and crippling economies only lends to the theory that P2P undermines the very foundations of traditional government structures. 

In places where cryptocurrency seems to thrive, are often the same where censorship, corruption and economic instability. 

First P2P Money. Next, P2P Internet.

Yet the common, centralized standards which were born out of corporate and political needs are failing us today. It’s time to turn the tides if we want to surf the web on our own terms. 

P2P networks have opened up entirely new philosophies around social and economic interactions. Researchers from a 2005 book exploring the potential of Peer-to-Peer Systems and Applications believed that these networks “promise….a fundamental shift of paradigms.” The client-server-based applications which formed in the early 1980s “can no longer fully meet the evolving requirements of the Internet. In particular, their centralized nature is prone to resource bottlenecks. Consequently, they can be easily attacked and are difficult and expensive to modify due to their strategic placement within the network infrastructure.”

In the past decade, we have seen a re-emergence of P2P protocols. These new community-powered networks are creating entirely new systems, such as economic systems, that are evolving beyond the traditional concepts of P2P. This was kickstarted in many respects by Bitcoin. Its underlying blockchain technology redefined our understanding of P2P, merging it with game theory, securing it with cryptography and expanding its network with a common CPU (in the first few years, at least). 

P2P access

There are many P2P “layers” that can restructure the internet itself. A decentralised VPN is one such layer, offering P2P access to information. 

This dVPN utilises a blockchain (the technology underlying Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies). It’s democratic and self-governing architecture distributes the workload and depends upon community participation. There are no centralised servers, but instead peers (nodes) each store and maintain the updated record of its current state. 

In the same way, anyone can be a part of a decentralised VPN. Your computer becomes a node, acting as a miniature server. This means it can help power the entire network by directly sharing its internet resources, such as bandwidth or IP address – and be paid for it. There is no need for a host or intermediary.  The bigger this distributed network grows, the stronger and faster it becomes, and this P2P access marketplace can serve a global community in need. 

This is what a future without internet censorship looks like… An internet powered by people is the next stage of its technological and social evolution.

A community-run VPN is different to a regular VPN in a few different ways. VPNs are businesses which exist to turn profit. Common VPNs own or rent servers that are centrally owned, and which could store logs of all your traffic without anyone knowing (in theory). You simply have to trust that they won’t do anything with this info. And while your data is encrypted, there have been cases of past hackings. 

A P2P VPN instead leverages a decentralised network so that your encrypted data passes through a distributed node network, similar to Tor. A single node will never be able to identify you or your online activities, nor can authorities and third parties. In its decentralised form, a VPN pays people (nodes) for providing the privacy service. And as with most P2P systems, a decentralised VPN has no single point of failure or attack, making it safer and stronger than centralised alternatives.

Related: VPN vs TOR vs dVPN. What’s the difference?

Power of the P

Often perceived as a more rudimentary technology, the potential of peer-to-peer technology has been shoved to the digital back shelf for some time. But as the internet evolves as a social and economic landscape, it’s slowly starting to take its rightful place in the online realm. In its simplicity lies its beauty. The most complex and honest human interactions are always the most direct and transparent. 

A P2P VPN is just one example of these many different applications. You can try the Mysterium VPN for yourself and experience how P2P works. There are versions for Mac and Android, currently free before our full launch in the coming weeks.

Mysterium Node Runner settles claim in Germany

Permissionless networks come with regulatory grey zones. This is known. We are here to change an existing system. 

Mysterium Network is building an incentivised, permissionless network. When we first came together as a project team, we knew this day, and more of its kind would come. 

TOR project, a front runner in this the distributed internet space has faced its fair share of battles against systems of centralisation. A quick google search shows up specific cases against Tor exit nodes. You can see some examples here and here

Mysterium Node Runner settles claim in Germany

On 15-04-2020, a legal claim was presented against a Mysterium Node Runner in Germany. The claim was that someone was uploading copyrighted content through this node. While no file size was specified, a checksum of the file that had been uploaded was provided.

The Mysterium support team worked with the node runner to help him retrieve logs and investigate how many nodes were connected at a given timestamp. This information helped the node runner to prove there were other members in his “household”, i.e. network. 

Our understanding is that the case is now closed.

Mysterium Network’s ongoing commitment to Node Runners

As participants in a permissionless network, we as a community are committed to a free-er internet. 

We are happy to work with node runners to provide any information (within our means, we are after all a decentralised system) to help in cases like the one above. 

As technology providers, we will try our best to protect all actors within the network. In saying this, given the research and development phase of Mysterium Network, we cannot guarantee protection for Mysterium Node Runners.

We understand the need for a legal framework to help protect node runners and have prioritised this following our launch to mainnet. For now, we urge you to look at TOR tips for running an exit node as guidance.

We are also currently seeking guidance from industry bodies within the internet freedom landscape to help shape an industry standard for dVPN, so that we can work towards a long term solution to a known problem. 

We thank you for your commitment to the cause. 

Onward. 

Join the Mysterium Army. Spread digital 💜🌈

Every revolution begins with a click

Mysterium Network has been a grassroots and community-driven project helping users sell wifi access to those in heavily censored regions.

You are quite literally what powers our network. The fabric of an interconnected, open and democratic internet is tearing apart in the hands of corporations and governments. You are the common thread that keeps it tied together. 

Related: What is happening to our internet? And what can we do to stop it?

We consider our community to be our strongest asset. And we need your help in educating others on privacy, anti-censorship and the need for VPNs. Teach others how to sell wifi access, set up their dVPN, or learn about their digital rights. 

We want to be a platform for your voice in this joint journey towards building a sustainable, permissionless VPN network which protects every online citizen. 

Help us in this battle for the internet we all deserve.

Get up Stand up for your Rights

How can you fight the power?

Help a friend set up a node

If you’re not already running a node, you should be. If you have a friend who wants to contribute to our network, that’s the first step. Check out our definitive guide to becoming a Mysterium Node to get started.

Create content and engage in intelligent conversations on social media

#netneutrality #internet #censorship #freespeech #privacy #isp #dataprivacy

The dVPN market is constantly evolving, help us place Mysterium Network front and center of it.

Related: A comparison of decentralised VPNs (dVPN)

Host a local meet up and give away nodes

We’re currently paying bounties for nodes in the UK, US, Italy and Germany. More geographies coming soon. We can also load you up with swag.

Start a telegram group in your language

Our movement is global. Join our discord channels and speak with @JX2OPS or @SharminiR about how you can help.

ابنِ على شبكة مستيريوم

We are open source. We encourage you to understand our technology and utilize our node network within your service. You will find our developers in our .

Help us spread good digital vibes around the world

Sign up to hear first about new geographies we will be adding and other upcoming developments.

 

يرجى الحذر من محاولات الاحتيال، لن نطلب منك أبداً أن تعطينا مفتاحك الخاص.

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