All Posts By

Savannah

Mysterium VPN launches on Linux

Linux VPN

Mysterium has welcomed Linux to the family. The Linux package supports Debian systems (such as Ubuntu) via our VPN desktop app.

This is a plug-and-play native app. It requires very little configuration, with more features than most open-source VPN clients that often require some technical knowledge.

Click here for immediate download of the Linux package. Or, explore the latest releases in our GitHub.

What is Linux?

Linux is an operating system, just like Windows or Mac OS. The Android mobile operating system is actually based on a modified version of the Linux kernel.

This open-source project launched in 1991 and their technology is used for a huge range of applications and systems including desktops, servers, internet infrastructure, supercomputers and even stock exchanges. Linux is also generally far less vulnerable to everyday attacks and malware, making it a favourite among programmers and businesses. 

Linux as an open-source pioneer

One of the original proponents of open-source technology is the Linux OS, making it a perfect fit for our community of users and developers. Linux has made its source code available since its launch. Developers can even modify and sell their version of the operating system so long as they license it under the Linux name. Many developers prefer Linux over iOS and Windows because it is more customisable. Its applications, word processors, photo editors and web browsers can be switched out and altered.

The Linux Foundation provides a neutral, trusted home for developers to collaborate on open technology projects. Developers are encouraged to contribute to hundreds (if not thousands) of different projects.

You can read more on why we chose to open source our own encryption software on Hackernoon.

Mysterium VPN  is also available for AndroidMac and Windows. 

If you are interested in participating, running a node, or generally have any questions, jump into our discord channel and speak directly with our core team.

Mysterium Network Product Updates – February 2021

Mysterium Network is building a decentralised VPN.

Our global network is open, permissionless and distributed. Last year we focused on finetuning our node software, and understanding the dynamics of incentivised networks. This year, we’re focusing on building censorship-proof applications. If you haven’t already, please make sure to download Mysterium VPN for Windows, Mac and Android. Let us know what you think on Discord or Twitter. It’s only been a couple of months but 2021 has already seen the team busier than ever.

Check out our latest product updates;

Our network achieved new milestones

We officially switched off Testnet 1.0 and released Testnet 2.0, having migrated most users and nodes across. Our network is now powered by 1100+ exit nodes (and growing), with 100+ Tb of traffic coursing throughout Mysterium.

We also extended our node bounty rules, so now 400 residential nodes are receiving payouts each month.

These are key milestones for Mysterium Network as we gear towards Ethereum Mainnet. It reflects the growing interest in – and product-market fit – for our use case (when it comes to nodes and users) across several regions in the world.

Mysterium VPN suite of apps are being revamped

We have finalised the new designs for our Android app and started working on designs for our desktop apps. 

We also started working on our iOS app prototype so we can reach this new community of users. This prototyping will help understand the challenges of ensuring that Mysterium dVPN is compliant with Apple store requirements, and the work required to make Mysterium dVPN available on the Apple store. One of the key challenges unearthed during this process was the size of 15 MB RAM maximum background processing allowed for apps on the AppStore. Our head of product, Jaro Satkevic dives deeper into this topic in this video.  

We’re fast approaching the launch of our Linux dVPN app, which is 90% complete.

Our Affiliate program is in the works, so soon our network participants will be rewarded when they introduce peers to the Mysterium universe. 

On the backend side, we’ve dedicated a significant chunk of time to the stability of our apps and nodes and fixed a lot of bugs.

We’ve worked on better quality parameters and measurements, such as the connection between the app and nodes in various regions. Distance between the user and node is one of the keys to quality of service that the user receives. For example, a particular node could provide a very stable service for someone in Brazil but may be lower performance for users from Russia. We’re working to stabilise this and ensure consistent quality for all connections across Mysterium Network. 

“Quality bars” will be introduced in our apps in the following week, enhancing and progressing our Smart Connect feature.

We’ve included a new auto-update feature in our desktop app, which checks for the latest app version and will upgrade upon launch. This will provide a better UX for our users and contribute to a more stable network overall.

We have removed Google Analytics from our desktop apps.

 

Payments

Thanks to our integration with Coingate, Mysterium users have started topping up their accounts using all kinds of crypto. We’re seeing a growing number of people using their BTC, LTC, ETH and MYST to use Mysterium dVPN app. We’ve also updated the Top Up and wallet screens for our desktop apps, making it a more streamlined and frictionless experience.

Our integration with Matic Network (recently rebranded to Polygon) is currently in progress. Ethereum deposits and withdrawals are halfway there. This is the last step before we switch to the Matic testnet in the production stage. This will also lead to our full BetaNet release when Matic will become our main blockchain platform. 

We’re also looking at the listing of MYST on additional DEXes. CEXes are also being considered.

 

Protocol

We’ve been deep in the research phase for new MYST tokenomics models. This involves a staking mechanism for Hermes hubs and introduces some new DeFi elements. More details on this will be published soon. 

We’ve also been reconsidering our pricing model. By the end of March, we should propose a much better solution than our current one. While nodes are currently free to set their own price, many node runners don’t know which pricing is reasonable. This is because users have to filter by not only quality and location, but also look at pricing. For the auto-reconnect feature, where the app looks at a similar node during a session break, this also complicates things. We’re going to introduce “surge” pricing based on supply and demand for nodes in any given region. This will also allow Mysterium to spread traffic more equally among nodes. More details on this to come.

 

Company

We’re fast expanding our team. Please look at our open positions or pass on the details. 

There were some great interviews with various team members from Mysterium. You can see the playlist here.

Want to get involved in Mysterium Network today?

Mysterium Network is a decentralized VPN, with a growing global residential IP node network. There are versions for  AndroidMac and Windows, currently free before our full launch.

Stay tuned for more updates. If you are interested in participating, running a node, or generally have any questions, jump into our discord channel and speak directly with our core team.

Testnet 1.0 ends as Testnet 2.0 unlocks new milestone

Following a successful migration to Testnet 2.0, we’re excited to announce that Mysterium’s Testnet 1.0 is being “switched off” forever.

Our migration began earlier this year, but you can already see the latest network statistics showing the amazing growth of both our node runner and user communities.

We’ve seen healthy organic growth of our node network in particular, reaching 1000 exit nodes and 100+ Tb of monthly traffic coursing throughout.

This continues from our impressive network growth in 2020. In fact, it’s already 2x our 2020 high in just the first quarter of 2021.

 

We’ve also seen 25% increase in our monthly active user base since the end of 2020.

This graph shows the transition of Mysterium dVPN users from Testnet 1.0 across to Testnet 2.0 over the last three months.

This new milestone keeps us right on track for our product roadmap, easing us into Stage 3.

If you’re running a node, you can read more about our latest node bounty updates, including changes to payouts and our plans to extend the opportunity of earning to more regions around the world. 

For the month of March we are excited to announce the addition of Canada and India to our residential IP bounty program. These have been long requested in our community and we hope to see consistent growth of node runners throughout both regions.

Here are some other TL;DR announcements coming to you soon: 

  1. New Mobile App Design – if you haven’t seen it yet, check out the sneak peek of our slick new UI 
  2. Launch of Affiliate Program – introducing your friends to Web 3.0 will give you more than just kudos

Mysterium Network – a resilient anti-censorship layer for web 3.0

Mysterium Network is a decentralized VPN, with a growing global residential IP node network. There are versions for  Android, Mac and Windows, currently free before our full launch.

Stay tuned for more updates. If you are interested in participating, running a node, or generally have any questions, jump into our discord channel and speak directly with our core team.

$MYST now listed on Bittrex Global

Bittrex Mysterium MYST

Major exchange Bittrex has launched Mysterium on their platform, introducing MYST token to the global cryptocurrency market.

This listing is an exciting gateway to MYST and unlocks new liquidity for the entire Mysterium ecosystem. 

Anyone holding MYST will now be able to receive and store their tokens in their Bittrex wallets.

From 28th January, any Bittrex Global user holding Bitcoin (BTC) or USDT can easily get their hands on some MYST tokens.

The trading pairs available:

  • BTC <> MYST
  • USDT <> MYST

Note that users who send their old legacy MYST tokens (unmigrated) to the exchange will LOSE them permanently. Learn how to migrate manually here.

What this means for the community

Uganda protests social media tax

Internet censorship and surveillance is expected to worsen in 2021. In the second week of January alone, a total internet shutdown was ordered in Uganda, coordinated by the country’s dictatorial leadership, in an attempt to disrupt the nation’s democratic general election. 

Mysterium’s peer-to-peer network powers censorship-resistant applications which can give users secure and private access to the internet. We are reinventing the $30 billion VPN industry with this next-generation internet technology. 

It helps bypass debilitating blackouts which infringe on our basic human rights, such as freedom of speech and access to information. We’re rewiring the internet from the inside out, creating a new, more secure layer of the internet that cannot be switched off by governments or corporations.

And the MYST token ties it all together.

As we grow and make Mysterium Network an increasingly global platform, we need this native token to also be available and tradeable on a global level. 

Though built on Ethereum, we’re a blockchain agnostic project. We want to ensure our community is made up of a diverse range of cryptocurrency users, not just those familiar with Ethereum-based utility tokens. 

Making MYST available on a global exchange means we can lower the barrier to entry so our dVPN can be discovered and easily accessible by crypto holders everywhere.

What is MYST?

MYST is the network’s reserve currency. Instead of paying a regular VPN service a monthly subscription to unblock websites and apps, users pay peers (nodes) within the distributed network to connect to their residential IP address. Users can pay with MYST and other major cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin (BTC), while nodes easily earn MYST by the minute or hour.

The MYST token does more than transfer value in the network. It acts like digital fuel, powering Mysterium’s various functions and applications, while keeping the network safe from things like DDoS attacks. 

Like most other cryptocurrencies, MYST has helped forge new online communities, where global networks like ours can easily share internet resources with each other, such as storage, computing power, and now privacy.

web 3 mysterium

MYST token helps power new decentralised apps and platforms which make up the Web 3.0

What is Bittrex Global?

Bittrex Global is a secure, reliable and advanced digital asset trading platform developed for international (non-USA) customers and built on Bittrex’s cutting-edge technology. This international trading platform provides innovative tokens, while also providing instant trade execution, dependable digital wallets, and industry-leading security practices.

Some main benefits of trading via Bittrex:

  • Secure platform 

Bittrex Global employs the most reliable, effective security technologies available. Security is always their first priority. 

  • Custom-built trading engine

Their custom trading engine was designed to be scalable and to ensure that orders are executed in real-time. 

  • Fast deposits and withdrawals

A highly efficient and automated monitoring platform allows Bittrex to provide users the fastest transactions available today. This includes updates on balance, trade, and holding information. 

  • Driving Innovation 

To help drive innovation in the blockchain industry, Bittrex seeks to provide its users with an ever-growing selection of blockchain technologies and digital tokens, including tokenised stocks of Tesla, Apple and Amazon shares.

Bittrex trading competition

MYST trading competition on Bittrex Global

To kick off our launch on Bittrex Global, we’re giving away $15,000 in MYST tokens to our new community of Bittrex users.

The competition will kick off on the 1st of February and run for seven days. It includes three types of promotions, which reward Bittrex users when they trade with MYST. You can read about the trading competition on the Bittrex website.

Note that to participate in this competition you will need a Bittrex Global account.

 

Promotion #1: Trade MYST to win $7,500 in MYST Tokens

Promotion #2: Buy MYST to Win $5,000 in MYST Tokens

Promotion #3: Sign up for a Bittrex Global account, trade MYST, and get free tokens 

 

(Terms and conditions apply, so be sure to read these first on the Bittrex website.)

Uniswap Liquidity Campaign

For those seeking a decentralized trading alternative, we launched the MYST Liquidity Engagement Campaign earlier this month. It rewards liquidity providers for providing liquidity to the MYST/ETH pair on UniSwap.

We have already completed our latest airdrop for participants, with our liquidity pool doubling in size since the beginning of the campaign. So far, participants have received their share of more than 7700 $MYST.

Join the campaign here.

Uniswap Liquidity

Dive into the dVPN with MYST

Last month we shared details of Mysterium’s testnet upgrade, which came with some exciting new features and functionalities. This includes changes to our node registration flow, updates to My Mysterium Network, a different UI, the ability to earn in 2 networks during the migration, top up VPN apps with your crypto of choice (not just MYST), and the freedom to use our dApp in China!

We have been in stealth mode upgrading a small percentage of our user base and node runners onto Testnet 2.0, to test and learn. Now we’re rolling out Testnet 2.0 to everyone on Mysterium Network. 

You can experience the power of our global, decentralized network at your fingertips, using your crypto of choice. Top up your Mysterium dVPN account with Bitcoin, Litecoin, Ether or any other major crypto thanks to our Coingate integration. 

crypto vpn

Download Mysterium dVPN today and experience some MYST magic for yourself.

With Mysterium dVPN, you’ll get some free test tokens. After you run out of these tokens, you will be prompted to top up with MYST, BTC, LTC or other cryptocurrencies. Download the Mysterium VPN now and try before you buy.

Mysterium Network Product Updates – November 2020

Mysterium Network is building a decentralised VPN. Our global network is open, permissionless and distributed. Last year we focused on finetuning our node software, and understanding the dynamics of incentivised networks. This year, we’re focusing on building censorship-proof applications. If you haven’t already, please make sure to download Mysterium VPN for Windows, Mac and Android. Let us know what you think on Discord or Twitter.

The past month has seen us charge full steam ahead with our Testnet 2.0 upgrade. With this upgrade comes some exciting new features and functionalities for both users and node runners within the network.

Check out these latest product updates;

 

Testnet 2.0 launched (beta)

We deployed the newest version of our smart contracts onto the Goerli testnet.

This updated Testnet 2.0 (version v0.41 of the Mysterium app) is being tried out by a small group of beta testers. Based on their feedback and experiences, 2.0 should be released for everyone else very soon.

With this upgrade, node registration flow has changed. Providers will get free registration with zero stake (while still on testnet) and should keep their same Testnet 1.0 identity. For providers, any earned settlement is two times cheaper than before.

These new smart contracts are also using a new version of MYSTT token. It’s essentially the same as our real MYST token, but on Goerli testnet. It has 18 zeros after comma (instead of 8 ), which required us to refactor all payments-related code to account for micropayments correctly.

 

Top up with your crypto of choice

All Android beta testers can now top up their Mysterium VPN balance using various cryptocurrencies (other than MYST), such as BTC, LTC, ETH, Dai and more! This will soon be available to our entire community of Android users. Note you’ll need to download or update to the latest version of the app (v0.40+) when available.

This functionality is supported by an upgraded Hermes protocol, with our micropayment hub now supporting multiple chains.

 

Unblocked in China

We’ve been working hard to reverse the ban of Mysterium VPN in China. The first iteration of our unblocking is done. Those who start using Testnet 2.0 apps (node v0.40+) will be able to access Mysterium from China!

 

Cleaner UI

We updated the Web UI so it is far more stable, with fewer glitches.

We found and fixed lots of bugs found during ALPHA testing in preparation of our upcoming node release.

We also created user-friendly consumer CLI commands. Now it’s much easier to use Mysterium VPN for advanced Linux users and on servers.

 

Matic x Mysterium 

We started working on our integration with Matic Network. Most of our infrastructure components are ready for Matic, so now we’re working on building the Matic<>Ethereum bridges needed before its public release.

 

My.Mysterium.Network updates

We updated and deployed multiple versions of MMN, so users of Testnet 1.0, Testnet 2.0 and the upcoming betanet could get access to an aggregated node dashboard. The Testnet 2.0 version of MMN will look a little different than yje current version, and we hope it will solve a couple of usability problems we had before.

Nodes can also store beneficiary (payout) wallet address on the Ethereum blockchain, instead of a database. The new MMN has been adapted so it can be used for bounty payments.

We also discovered some node runners who were cheating the system. We therefore started a blacklist so they could not participate in any future bounty program.

Want to get involved in Mysterium Network today?

Mysterium Network is a decentralized VPN, with a growing global residential IP node network. There are versions for  AndroidMac and Windows, currently free before our full launch.

Stay tuned for more updates. If you are interested in participating, running a node, or generally have any questions, jump into our discord channel and speak directly with our core team.

How To Bypass Internet Shutdown

internet blackout toolkit

How does an internet shutdown work? And how do you bypass internet shutdowns? Learn about the different tools, platforms and software that will keep you online.

Discover and download the Internet Blackout Toolkit so you can be prepared and keep connected.

What is an Internet Shutdown?

In simple words, an internet shutdown involves intentionally disrupting or blocking internet access. They are also referred to as kill switches and blackouts. They can be done through throttling, when connectivity speeds are reduced to such a slow pace it’s almost impossible for pages to load. It’s also done by working with Internet Service Providers to cut off web access altogether.

Internet blackouts can occur at a localised or even national level, where an entire country has its telecommunications cut off. They are divided into two categories;

Partial Shutdown: The government limits access to specific websites or apps. A partial shutdown is done to prevent people from sharing information with others, typically via social media. 

Total Shutdown: In a total shutdown, all internet services are entirely stopped, including mobile data services and broadband carriers. The internet is no longer functional, and people cannot get online via any device. In developing nations, where internet access is unreliable, people take some time to understand that an intentional intervention is taking place.

Shutdowns are becoming more common every year. In 2015, only 15 shutdowns were documented. This number rose to 56 in 2016. In India alone, Human Rights Watch reported 20 shutdowns in 2017. However, www.internetshutdowns.in documented 41 shutdowns for the same period.

Why are Internet Shutdowns Used?

Most governments around the world apply censorship in some way or another. But a total Internet shutdown has a more immediate and widespread effect.

Concerns for national security are the leading cause of internet shutdowns globally. But governments also claim that shutdowns are necessary to prevent the spread of misinformation and ensure public safety

Some common reasons given for blackouts: 

More often than not, internet shutdowns are a means to control the views and actions of people. They limit a citizen’s ability to access information and express themselves freely. It means businesses are put on hold, students can’t study, and critical health services cannot be reached. Overall, the economy suffers and social life is disrupted. 

Internet shutdowns and your human rights

In more extreme cases, shutdowns disrupt democracy and journalists cannot report on government corruption or abuse. Social media blackouts are also commonly used during elections to minimise public discourse, stifle dissent and weaken minority groups. These platforms for open expression and communication, such as Twitter, are a threat to many dictatorial regimes and are therefore blocked. It’s far easier to control and promote the official government narrative if the general population is silenced. 

Unsurprisingly though, internet blackouts tend to attract global attention and put pressure on countries that use them. This produces the Streisand effect, in which trying to hide information or silence voices can cause the unintended effect of bringing these events even more attention. By incorporating transparency into governmental procedures, civil unrest is less likely to occur. 

The world leader in internet shutdowns is India, who frequently shutdown the internet in certain regions for reasons such as avoiding loss of life during periods of crisis. Yet an outdated law from 1885 is used to justify these frequent internet shutdowns. In 2019, authorities shut down the internet in Kashmir for months, revoking their autonomy and statehood. This was deemed necessary to avoid “to maintain security in the restive territory claimed by both India and Pakistan.”. 

However, a study by Stanford Global Digital Policy Incubator states that shutdowns are counterproductive to discouraging violent events. The study found there was an increase of violence by four times when networks were disrupted. 

Other experts believe that as the frequency of internet shutdowns increase, they will become normalised. So while national security is the initial justification, citizens may become complacent over time, even as the use of shutdowns are used for more sinister purposes.

Impacts of Internet Shutdown

Aside from the threat to people’s human rights, internet shutdowns have a major impact on national economies, jobs and growth. Businesses are cut off from their customers, suppliers and distributors, incurring huge losses that governments won’t simply pay back. 

According to Brookings, in 2015-16, internet shutdowns cost the entire world $2.4 billion, with India alone suffering a loss of $1bn in economic production. During the Arab Spring in Egypt, the cost of an internet blackout resulted in a $90 million loss. If the shutdown continued for the whole year, it would have cost 3-4% of Egypt’s GDP

In Cameroon, many entrepreneurs suffer during an internet shutdown. Businesses that rely on the internet, especially e-commerce websites, were adversely impacted. As a residual effect, shutdowns prevent investment opportunities; if businesses operate in a country with frequent shutdowns, investors are not likely to back them, as they can’t continuously run their business operations. 

If a website is hosted in a particular country that experiences a blackout, this means the rest of the world also loses access to that service. This could disrupt or cut off supply chains, financial transactions, interpersonal communication, and enterprise workflows. It may also have a localisation effect, as the internet no longer becomes a reliable platform for business, forcing companies to turn inward, rather than outward and join the global economy. 

Aside from the economy, most people depend on the internet in some way in their daily lives. Without a functioning internet, fundamental services like healthcare, education, banks, and other public services are slowed down or come to a standstill. Quality of life is greatly diminished and the risk to livelihoods and health increases, especially when people can’t contact emergency services.

A local internet shutdown can also have a significant technical impact on the rest of the internet. The web is an interconnected network where everyone contributes to the system as a whole. Internet shutdowns can undermine the network and generate systemic risks.

How to Bypass Internet Shutdowns?

The United Nations Human Rights Council condemned internet blackouts for breaching your human rights. And while internet shutdowns are still becoming more commonplace, there are ways to arm yourself now in case you experience one. 

Here are some ways to bypass internet shutdowns; 

Use a VPN

A VPN (Virtual Private Network) creates a secure portal between devices, providing an encrypted connection to the internet no matter where you are. When you use a VPN, your computer or phone is connected to a VPN’s server, located overseas. This hides your IP address and enables you to visit websites that were restricted before, as you’re “tricking” your ISP into thinking you’re somewhere else. VPNs are regarded as the easiest and safest way to bypass internet shutdowns. 

Laws around the use of VPNs vary by region. It’s important to understand the security aspects of each network before you use them. You can read through That One Privacy Site to learn about these different virtual networks.

Mysterium Network offers a decentralized VPN, which is built on the world’s largest P2P network. You can easily select from a list of locations around the world to connect to, unblocking content. It’s open-source and available for Mac, Windows, and Android. 

Also ensure that websites you visit are running over HTTPS (Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure), even when using a VPN. This means you will always access the original website and not any modified version of it. You can install HTTPS Everywhere extension for Chrome, Firefox, and Opera, to guarantee you’re browsing the encrypted version of the website. 

Circumvention Tools and Proxies

Circumvention tools help you bypass censored websites and anonymously browse the internet. They can help you become undetectable to ISPs and governments. Users channel their traffic via a different computer – called a proxy. 

Psiphon is an award-winning circumvention system that leverages open-source web proxies, helping you skirt around content-filtering systems. 

Lantern is another open-source proxy software application for desktop and mobile. It provides users access to the open internet. Lantern is different from other tools as it leverages peer-to-peer connections for internet connectivity when servers are not available. 

Tails is an operating system that allows you to browse the internet on any computer. It uses cryptographic tools to encrypt email messages and files.

Tor Browser is a tool for accessing blocked websites without being tracked. It routes your traffic through a global node network run by volunteers, much like a decentralized VPN. This prevents surveillance of your browsing habits or tracing your location. It is very popular among journalists and privacy advocates. It’s available for Linux, Mac, Windows, and Android. 

Whonix is a free and open-source desktop operating system (OS) that is specifically designed for advanced security and privacy. The software helps you run your apps anonymously, anonymising everything you do online. The project suggests it’s the best way to use Tor, as it provides the strongest protection of your IP address. Whonix is available for Windows, macOS and Linux.

The Guardian Project also offers apps such as Orbot that help you access the internet anonymously by encrypting your internet traffic.

Use censorship-resistant websites and networks

Unstoppable Domains is a platform to launch uncensorable websites. The domain runs on the blockchain (decentralized and permanent) and is stored in your cryptocurrency wallet, so no one can take it down but you. You can also use their chat and email functions, so you can communicate directly peer-to-peer. 

I2P is an anonymous network built on top of the internet. It allows users to create and access content and build online communities. It is intended to protect communication and resist monitoring by third parties such as ISPs. All data is wrapped with several layers of encryption, and the network is both distributed and dynamic, with no trusted parties. 

Freenet is a peer-to-peer platform for censorship-resistant communication and publishing.

The software lets you anonymously share files, browse and publish “freesites” (web sites accessible only through Freenet) and chat on forums. Freenet is decentralised to make it less vulnerable to attack, and if used in “darknet” mode, users only connect to their friends, making it very difficult to detect. Communications by Freenet nodes are encrypted and are routed through other nodes to make it extremely difficult to determine who is requesting the information and what its content is.

Communication Tools - encrypted and offline

There are messaging tools that are designed for private and censorship-proof communications. Popular apps like Telegram encrypt your messaging, including client-client encryption with Secret Chats. Signal is also well-known for its encryption and security.

Vuvuzela is a private chat application that hides metadata, including who you chat with and when you are chatting. Vuvuzela supports millions of users and is secure even if the network and a majority of the servers are compromised.

There are also offline communication tools that don’t require any internet access, but you’ll have to download and set them up when online.

Tools like Briar and Firechat are encrypted messaging platforms and rely on peer-to-peer networks. Moreover, they’re free and open-source.

Another project is Bridgefy.me that works on a mesh network (more on these below). This helps you use applications without an internet connection. Available on both iOS and Android, it covers thousands of users at the same time. 

While you’ll be unable to browse Facebook and Google, you can create a chat room and voice your message there during an internet shutdown.

Mesh networks

In certain scenarios, governments can also shut down central telecom systems. This can cut off all connection, or reduce its quality so much that it’s barely useable. This creates a need for an entirely new network altogether. 

Instead of connecting to the internet through your ISP, mesh networks enable direct connection between devices, without any middlemen. Mesh networks automatically reconfigure connections, depending upon the availability and proximity of bandwidth and storage.

As they are decentralized networks, it isn’t easy to shut them down. One possible way to do it is by shutting down each node, which is near impossible. Hence, mesh networks are robust and resistant to internet shutdowns.

Mesh networks are a relatively new concept and haven’t been implemented on a wide scale use yet. However, projects like Commotion are accelerating the adoption of mesh networks. You can easily set up your own network using their technology.

More Resources

There are lots of great resources that can link you to even more tools. Check out these guides and lists, but note some of these apps and software are a bit more advanced to set up and require more technical knowledge;

Internet Blackout Toolkit – Mysterium Labs

GitHub – Danoctavian – Awesome Anti-Censorship

GitHub – Kevin Coleman Inc – Awesome Privacy 

GitHub – Lissy93 – Personal Security Checklist

Along with all this knowledge, also be sure to install antivirus software. This guarantees that there is no malicious software on your laptop. Ephraim Muchemi, who conducts training in digital security with the US-based non-profit International Research and Exchange Board, states that antivirus is the key to everything. Some suggested options are MalwareBytes and HitmanPro.

Organisations

There are also many organisations out there fighting for your digital freedom and human rights. You can learn about the work they’re doing, and often collaborate or get involved in advocacy work; 

Access Now is a group that defends citizen’s digital rights across the globe, with an objective to abolish the practice of internet shutdown. They are a great resource for learning about internet shutdowns. 

Article19 – works for a world where all people everywhere can freely express themselves and actively engage in public life without fear of discrimination.

We do this by working on two interlocking freedoms: the Freedom to Speak, and the Freedom to Know

Human Rights Watch – We advocate for laws and policies that promote privacy, digital inclusion, and respect for human rights by social media platforms.

Electronic Frontier Foundation – leading nonprofit defending digital privacy, free speech, and innovation

Internet Society  – a global nonprofit organization empowering people to keep the Internet a force for good: open, globally connected, secure, and trustworthy.

Unblock the future

Recently, students from London’s Imperial College and Royal College of Art have developed a system, called Fallback, which offers access to news coverage through a portable satellite modem during internet shutdown. 

The tool is a subscription-based model that enables users to pre-select the news websites they usually read. During a shutdown, news articles can be encrypted and delivered to them via satellite. 

A portable server helps decrypt the data, and viewers can read on any Wifi-enabled device using a simplified user interface. Fallback works on a forecasting algorithm that can anticipate which nations are most at risk of an internet shutdown. Right now the team are trying to get the system up and running in countries where it’s needed most. 

An internet shutdown can be very daunting. But you rejoin the digital world by using the above tools and platforms. 

If you have a project or application that should be added to this list, please get in touch! We will be constantly updating it. 

Roadmap Update: no more free VPN, nodes get paid in $MYST

mysterium VPN

Has that gotten your attention?

 

Mysterium Network is maturing, alongside our wider ecosystem. With the freedom of speech online being debased, a global pandemic and other macro forces in play  – we see it as a priority to enable peer to peer payments in the most frictionless way possible. 

As we have written previously, transaction fees on Ethereum have proven to be a problem. But we have found the workaround.

To dive deeper, read these blogs:  

1. Layer 1, 2, 3 – and beyond: The search for the cheapest and fastest microtransactions. [2020]

2. Mysterium Network’s Head of Product, Jaro Šatkevič breaks down a lightweight solution for Mysterium Network payments

3. Mysterium Network micropayments whitepaper [2019]

 

Mysterium Network Updated Roadmap Q4 2020

What does this mean?

 

Step one: Network Fork 1

 

All users and node runners within Mysterium Network will have to upgrade into testnet version two (Testnet 2.0).


What is Testnet 2.0?


a) New smart contracts on Goerli testnet – Mysterium Testnet 2.0 will be using new test MYSTT token, same code as new MYST token, with `permit` function and 18 zeros (instead of 8) after the comma. We will also be using a new set of payments smart contracts which will halve settlement of collected funds and add support for being used in multiple chains.

Read more in our deep dive on Layer 2 solutions so as to avoid ETH transaction fees.

b) Payment processor integration into apps  – this will provide the possibility for dVPN consumers to top-up via their Mysterium account with a set of different cryptocurrencies (such as BTC, LTC, ETH, BCH, DAI or USDT). Paid funds will be converted into MYST (or to MYSTT while in testnetv2) token and be sent into the user’s payment channels (top-up address) on the blockchain.

c) 1 MYSTT will be equal to 1 MYST. Also, bounty payouts will be done in MYST tokens. Previously we have pegged 1 collected MYSTT to 1 USD and did node runner bounty payouts in ETH. To take us closer to MainNet environment conditions, the time has come to implement pay-outs in MYST tokens. We will be still using our ETH bounty fund reserves, but we will be buying MYST token on the market to do payouts for node runners.

Users will have to update their applications. You will be given a starter kit of MYSTT. Following this users will need to top up using BTC, LTC, ETH and other cryptocurrencies.

Existing Node Runners will need to upgrade their node into the newest version, network upgrade will be done under the hood. For further updates specific to Node Runners check out our regularly updated network fork guide. 


Please note: 

  • Node runner bounty will be paid only for Mysterium Node Runners running on Testnet 2.0 
  • Node runners will begin to receive payouts in $MYST. 


A month after the transition begins, testnet 1.0 will be completely destroyed. Network fork ends.

Step two: 

 

We will be releasing BetaNet (silent launch for a limited set of test users) and upgrading Testnet 2.0 to use some of Ethereum’s sidechain and cross-chain payments (consumers will be on a sidechain testnet, and node runners will have their accounts on Ethereum Goerli testnet).

This upgrade will happen under the hood and users may even not recognise that such change happened.

This will mean cheaper on-chain transactions for users and node runners as account registration and top-ups will happen on the sidechain instead of Ethereum Blockchain, once on MainNet.

Stay tuned for exciting integration partnerships coming very soon. Subscribe to our newsletter to hear it first. 

As you can clearly see, the nature of the service we are offering and the emerging markets that we are a natural ally to, make Ethereum’s current transaction fees a lock out when onboarding new customers. 

As such, like many other Ethereum-based projects, Mysterium Network has had to reroute our roadmap in search of scalability solutions to give our users the cheapest and fastest service possible, while maintaining decentralized and noncustodial architecture. 

In the following sections, we will review existing Layer 2 solutions in relation to Mysterium Network’s use case, explaining how they offer both opportunities and limitations.

Step three:
Testnet as we know it is going to be destroyed.

Step four:  

 

All users and node runners within Mysterium Network will be upgraded onto Mysterium MainNet in 2021.

 

What is MainNet?


MainNet is Mysterium Network on Ethereum Blockchain. All internal payments will be done using real MYST tokens.

Users will pay as they go for VPN service on Mysterium Network. Mysterium Network will run a few free nodes so that new users can test the service before topping up their account. This is also when we will look to roll out our much-awaited referral program, and other user-focused bounties. 

Node Runners will continue to be paid in MYST. This marks the end of the Mysterium Node Pilot No provider bounty is needed at this point and node runners can settle collected funds any time you like.

What happened to our Mysterium Pro plans?


As we had previously written, we were considering Mysterium Pro as our solution to high Ethereum transaction fees

Thanks, to Multichain support and the ability to use sidechains for consumer payment channels (top-up wallet management), we can avoid releasing a custodial MysteriumPro solution and instead merge its best features (such as pay in different cryptos, or one-click connect) into the default Mysterium VPN application itself. 

Onward to MainNet

 

Mysterium has been hard at work getting peer to peer payments implemented within the network. This has meant the navigation of a quickly shifting technological landscape. We wouldn’t be here without our community of node runners, users and token holders. 

We thank you for your ongoing support and are excited about the new changes to come as Mysterium Network grows to meet the new and very real challenges of our times. 

If you haven’t already, download Mysterium VPN or start to run a node.

Layer 1, 2, 3 and beyond: The search for the cheapest and fastest microtransactions

How many layers does it take to get cheap and fast microtransactions?

Building on top of a quickly iterating Layer-2 scaling ecosystem has meant murky navigation of several new technologies. This is especially difficult for builders looking to find workarounds for high transaction fees on the Ethereum blockchain. 

The recent DeFi boom has led to users cramming into Ethereum Network and creating a large backlog of unprocessed transactions. This has meant network congestion, and high transaction fees – both of which are natural killers for decentralized applications and networks. 

Why are cheap and fast microtransactions important for decentralized networks? 

In Mysterium, a decentralized VPN, payments are peer to peer. Consumers of VPN are directly paying exit node runners for VPN service. As such, there is no middleman with the power to freeze payments. This means that payments happen minute by minute, with transaction values as small as 0.0001 USD (in our native token MYST).

The nature of the peer to peer, and second by second service consumption mean that decentralized VPNs, and other incentivized distributed networks depend on microtransactions as a means of reducing risk within their network economy. Learn more about peer to peer technologies.

Earlier this year, we released our own Layer 2 solution (based on payment channels) on Testnet. This enabled users to transact with one another autonomously, without a need for an intermediary (including us) and without touching Layer 1 (Ethereum blockchain). This introduced super cheap and instant transactions, and allowed paying with values as small as $0.0001.

However, one of the challenges with payment channels, our protocol included, is the need to have specific on-chain transactions. In the case of Mysterium Network this is seen in two events, dVPN account creation and top-up. 

Onward - the search for scalability

User story: As a user in Nigeria, I am looking for a VPN solution that lets me pay for what I consume. I am unable to afford the expensive subscription pricing of traditional VPNs. I try Mysterium VPN, which allows me to stream a video for $0.05 USD in MYST on their freemium version. I run out of free MYST and want to add an additional $1 USD (in MYST). I try to top up. It costs me $2.25 in ethereum tx fees to top up my Mysterium Account. I delete the app.

See our how our userbase is growing in Nigeria.

As you can clearly see, the nature of the service we are offering and the emerging markets that we are a natural ally to, make Ethereum’s current transaction fees a lock out when onboarding new customers. 

As such, like many other Ethereum-based projects, Mysterium Network has had to reroute our roadmap in search of scalability solutions to give our users the cheapest and fastest service possible, while maintaining decentralized and noncustodial architecture. 

In the following sections, we will review existing Layer 2 solutions in relation to Mysterium Network’s use case, explaining how they offer both opportunities and limitations.

Methodology: An Overview of Existing Solutions

Recently at Mysterium we did more research on various Layer 2 solutions and conducted an overview of the most recognised and trustworthy ones in 2020. In this overview, we looked at different sidechains, taking into consideration the differing motivations and user personas of actors within Mysterium Network – [Consumer/ User; Provider/ Mysterium Node Runner]. 

1. Sidechains or alternative blockchains with bridges to Ethereum blockchain

These types of solutions are characterised by xDAI, MaticRSK (RSK is creating bridges into Ethereum, meaning that you can technically move Ethereum based assets onto this Bitcoin sidechain).

The main value proposition of these solutions is they are scalable, capital efficient and offer fast withdrawal into Layer 1. The main drawback is that validators control the network and are able to freeze and confiscate funds with consensus.

This make sidechains unattractive to DeFi (who lock hundreds of millions) offerings, while they remain relevant for a decentralized VPN use case such as Mysterium Network. This is due to the fact that DeFi carries with it different risks when compared to a dVPN.

Matic Network

The following two examples, Plasma and Rollups are different articulations of sidechains, built more specifically for the Ethereum ecosystem.

2. Plasma

Plasma is a framework proposed for scaling Ethereum using hierarchical sidechains. Plasma type sidechains (also referred to as child chains) allow a majority of transactions to occur outside of the Ethereum blockchain. Only deposits and withdrawals, and points of entry and exit are handled on the main blockchain smart contract.

To make sure that transactions are final, Plasma operators run a “state commitment”. This is a cryptographic method for storing a compressed version of the state of sidechain inside the Ethereum blockchain. This storage of a compressed version of the state impacts the user experience of Plasma as it makes it challenging for users to withdraw their tokens. Users are required to be both online frequently and to download data.

While offering significant speed (up to 1000 transactions per second) and latency improvements over Ethereum, Plasma cannot offer the near-zero latency and near-free transaction fees required for a decentralized VPN micropayments solution.

One of the differentiators, and drawbacks of Plasma as a Layer 2 solution is it allows users to leave the network at any time – an action referred to as “exiting”. This means that users can safely withdraw their funds from Plasma even if it is shut down by validators. But this has to be done in a certain period of time and done by everyone. Read more about the mass exit problem in Plasma.

Another drawback, Plasma is not 100% EVM compatible. This would mean any decentralized application building on Ethereum would have to update their smart contracts or it might even not be possible to build on Plasma

Dive deeper into Plasma and its potential applications within distributed networks in Mysterium Network’s Micropayments Whitepaper.

Plasma network

3. Rollups

Rollups are Layer-2 scaling solutions similar in form to Plasma in that a single mainchain contract holds all funds and a cryptographic commitment to larger sidechain state. This state is maintained by users and operators offchain, providing an independence from Layer 1 storage. This is the biggest scalability benefit of Rollups.

 

    1. Optimistic Rollups


      Optimistic Rollups are constructions which enable autonomous smart contracts on Layer 2 using OVM. Borrowing heavily from both Plasma and ZK Rollup designs, Optimistic Rollups trades of some scalability to enable running fully general smart contracts on Layer 2, secured by Layer 1.

      It promises an easy way to migrate existing decentralized solutions and services with a reasonable degree of security/ scalability trade offs. Karl Floresch goes into more detail on Optimistic Rollups and OVM.

    2. ZK Rollups


      ZK Rollups is a Layer 2 solution where data is placed onchain.

      With ZK Rollups operators generate Zero-Knowledge Proof (SNARK) for every state transition, making it impossible for operators to commit an invalid or manipulated state.

      ZK Rollups should theoretically be able to process up to 2,000 transactions per second. 


ZK Rollups solution differs from Plasma as it solves the mass exit problem, meaning that validators are unable to freeze funds and users have no time limit to move funds out of Layer 2 even in case of emergency This makes ZK Rollups a great fit for both DeFi or cold wallets for Hodlrs. 

Its most known application is Loopring, a next-generation high-performance decentralized exchange and payment protocol also focused on scalability.

The challenge with ZK Rollups is the fundamental limitation in transaction amounts [2000 transactions per second], with current real world implementation, Loopring, achieving 500 transactions per second. 

Also, while transaction costs are lower than Ethereum, they cannot in theory be more than 100 times cheaper than Ethereum’s transaction costs. Most like 20 – 50 times cheaper according to our math.

Also, ZK Rollups are the more sophisticated and long term answer. Which as always, will take a longer time to implement. 

zKRollup

4. Payment channels

We have written extensively about payment channels both within our micropayments whitepaper released in 2019, and in several of our more recent updates:

    1. Introducing micropayments on Mysterium Network
    2. MYST, Migration and Mainnet
    3. Mysterium Network begins token migration

TL;DR

Payment channels fuse together the technologies and methodologies used by other payment solutions such as State Channels.

With payment channels parties exchange digital value without committing transactions to the blockchain. Only channel opening and closing are logged on the blockchain.

To open payment channels both parties have to lock some funds into a multisig smart contract. This allows both parties to update channel balances without the fear that funds will be double spent or stolen.

As these microtransactions are “commitments” rather than on-chain payments, we drastically reduce the total amount of transactions sent to the blockchain.

We dive deeper into what payment channels are, and how we envision them functioning in our micropayments whitepaper. Read more.

How are payment channels different from Plasma, ZK Rollups and Sidechains?

Layer 2 solution

From a technical perspective, Plasma and zkRollups – all fall into a wider umbrella of sidechains. Sidechains are fundamentally different in nature from payment channels. We highly recommend “Evaluating Ethereum Layer 2 Scaling Solutions: A Comparison Framework” for a deeper dive into the distinct differences between sidechains.

In our comparison of Layer-2 solutions, we saw that while Rollups are great in terms of security and give significant scalability over Layer 1, they do not completely solve for the challenge of micropayments needed for Mysterium Network. They have a limit of 2K tx/sec, and they don’t give users instant finality. Also the transaction price is still too expensive for $0.001 transactions.

In the following section we will explain how payment channels, and more specifically unidirectional payment channels are the best fit for the peer to peer decentralized virtual private network use case in Mysterium Network.

Payment channels are different as they are:

  • Flexible – i.e. able to live on layer 3, or 2 
  • Cheapest solution when it comes to transaction fees.
  • Most scalable in terms of peer to peer payments.
  • Could be used for cross-chain payments (e.g. from one side-chain to another, or from Layer 1 to Layer 2).

Sidechains (broadly speaking to include Plasma and ZK Rollups) bring with them limitations on transaction amounts. Payment channels on the other hand, could be foundational to cross-chain interoperability as they allow payments to move from one chain to another without custody – with zero costs, and in seconds. Don’t take my word for it, hear it from Vitalik himself.

Unidirectional vs Bi-directional payment channels

Why unidirectional payment channels?

In the case of Mysterium Network, most network actors are either consumers or providers (nodes) of VPN service. Payments are always going in one direction. There is only a need for providers (Mysterium Nodes) to rebalance the payment channel and settle earned tokens on Layer 1. 

Bi-directional payment channels are more complex and do not give Mysterium Network’s use case much value. Also, thanks to unidirectional payment channels our consumers don’t need to have apps online all the time to ensure that their funds will not be stolen. 

 

Payment Channels as Layer 3, on top of Layer 2 

As we continued to take apart different Layer 2 solutions, we came to the same conclusion. Payment channels – as described in our micropayments whitepaper – should be on Layer 3. 

  • Consumers of VPN service need at least one onchain transaction to top up their funds. With payment channels on Layer 3, we can capitalise on cheaper channel openings (account creation) and top-ups on Layer 2. So adding $1 to your dVPN app account will cost users 2 cents, not 2 dollars. This would greatly reduce friction in onboarding new users.
  • Providers of VPN service need at least one onchain transaction once in a week or so to receive their funds. In payment channels, once the value of the offchain commitment is bigger than the channel size, a settlement onchain is required. By offering flexibility we can let providers choose whether they choose to settle on Layer 2, or Layer 1.

    Why is this important? Some providers may send their funds to DeFis or exchanges often, this will mean moving from Layer 2 to Layer 1 regularly. As such being on Layer 1 makes more sense for providers with this particular profile. 

In a world of zkrollups, payment channels can be used as bridges within networks. – Vitalik Buterin

In conclusion: Multichain, cross-chain and the future of interoperability

We did all that research to find a solution for our own problem. We believe that we found it! 

Just to recap:

  • Ethereum transaction fees are killers for decentralized applications and services which depend on cheap onchain transactions
  • ZK Rollups seem to be a promising Layer 2 solution, but unfortunately, it is new and smart contract support is only on testnet. We will need to wait for at least half a year or longer. 
  • There are good sidechains such as xDAI and Matic network, but no one knows which will gain mass adoption or how they will evolve. Being tightly connected to one blockchain is a risk to Mysterium Network, or any decentralized service. It may mean a hard and complex migration in the future. 
  • Payment channels are able to be used in cross-chain transactions – this means that consumers of VPN services can hold their wallets on Layer 2, while a provider is on a different Layer 2 or even on a Layer 1 blockchain. 

Mysterium Network will be deployed on multiple chains and we already are working on cross-chain payments support. We see this as the future for most payment channel-based solutions. 

Exciting updates to our roadmap and partnership announcements coming soon. If you haven’t already – Get Mysterium VPN: Free on Testnet.

Mysterium Network Product Updates – October 2020

Mysterium Network is building a decentralised VPN. Our global network is open, permissionless and distributed. Last year we focused on finetuning our node software, and understanding dynamics in incentivised networks. This year, we’re balancing out the marketplace with focus on consumer applications. If you haven’t already, please make sure to download Mysterium VPN for Windows, Mac and Android. Let us know what you think on Discord or Twitter.

The past few months at Mysterium has seen us reroute our roadmap as we head towards mainnet launch. As with all new technologies built from scratch, we’ve encountered some unexpected challenges, which are shared with the entire industry! Building on top of a quickly evolving Ethereum ecosystem has been especially difficult for teams like us, who need workarounds for high transaction fees and network congestion. 

Aside from this renavigation, there have been some exciting developments and initiatives. Check out our latest product updates;

 

Networking research spikes: China and Iran

Our networking team is hard at work finding better ways to make us censorship-resistant. This includes overcoming the ban of our node discovery in certain parts of the world. The plan is to make our node discovery distributed, and as such, harder to block by firewalls. Increasing and securing this undetectability is an important step if we’re to reach vulnerable communities who need internet freedom the most.

 

Payments research spike

Our payments team dove deep into the various L2 scaling solutions in the market. Many of these solutions have emerged due to consistently high GAS prices on Ethereum mainnet. The goal was to evaluate both opportunities and possible limitations for Mysterium Network. We will be publishing a revised product roadmap in November. Our technical deep dive is also coming shortly.

 

Implementation of Coingate

We have made major headway into a Coingate integration. This will enable top-ups in your Mysterium account with various different cryptocurrencies (BTC, LTC, ETH, etc). Under the hood, the app will convert these cryptocurrencies into MYST and top up your Mysterium account (payment channel) with those MYST tokens. This is an important step towards lowering the barrier to entry, enabling a wider spread of adoption and more seamless access into Mysterium Network and its VPN services. This will be deployed and tested on Mysterium testnet in November.

 

Automated identity manager (Pilvytis)

Pilvytis “watches” the payment channels of given users and automatically tops them up when needed. This is important for potential B2B clients who have expressed demand for paying for VPN services in fiat. This is so that they can access Mysterium via network as a service (NaaS), guaranteeing that their consumer applications are never out of balance.

 

New WebUI

This effectively changes the node on-boarding process. Stay tuned for some changes in live environments (my.mysterium.network, node onboarding).

 

Top up flow for Android, Windows and Mac applications

In preparation for BetaNet launch and paid testnet, we have added new top up flows to our Android and desktop applications. Previously users were getting accounts for free, but in BetaNet (and mainnet in the future) they will have to top up their Mysterium account first. More detail on this in our roadmap updates in November.

 

Added referral program support

Users will be able to share referral links and receive rewards. These referral codes will give free account creation and some initial MYST to test the system. We want to reward our community and leverage their support to reach more people who need our dVPN.

 

Updated documentation for node runners (new docs coming soon)

This has been an ongoing project to clean up our documentation. We have started with node runners but this is a wider project to add more detail and clarity to our developer documentation in the future. #OpenSource

 

Want to get involved in Mysterium Network today?

Mysterium Network is a decentralized VPN, with a growing global residential IP node network. There are versions for  AndroidMac and Windows, currently free before our full launch.

Stay tuned for more updates. If you are interested in participating, running a node, or generally have any questions, jump into our discord channel and speak directly with our core team.

 

 

Introducing the dVPN Alliance

An alliance to make every netizen untraceable, unblockable and unhackable

After months of planning and collaborating with Sentinel, we’re excited to reveal the decentralized VPN (dVPN) alliance to the world. The new alliance is open to all Web 3 projects who want to build a better internet and create a unified standard around how censorship-resistant, privacy-focused platforms and tools are built.

Both Mysterium and Sentinel developed some of the first decentralized VPNs in the world. This initiative is more than a passion project – it’s time to step up the game. The alliance continues our commitment to protecting all online users from personal data hacks, cybercrime and surveillance. 

The internet continues to crumble in the hands of governments and corporations, as the first quarter of 2020 became the worst in data breach history with over 8 billion records exposed. Targets include high profile organisations and companies such as the United Nations, Twitter and Easyjet. Just this week, over 400,000 users of food delivery app Chowbus had their personal data leaked.

The news of our launch was syndicated in various global news publications, including Yahoo News, Yahoo Finance, Business Insider, Digital Journal, Crowdfund Insider, Blockonomi and Daily Hodl.

Marcel Velliux, a member of the SNT Foundation, a core supporter of the Sentinel network, spoke about the need for a decentralized alternative to regular VPNs. These common and popular VPNs hide the risks and flaws of their technology, such as logging and centralized storage of user data.

“There are very few enforced standards when it comes to building the platforms and tools which make up the internet today, said Velliux.

“This means that businesses, including VPNs, are free to track their users and store their data insecurely. While new legislation such as GDPR is a step in the right direction, it does nothing on the infrastructural level, which is why data hacks occur on a weekly basis.” 

dVPN alliance

This new digital collective hopes to bring more projects to the table to help shape policy and public understanding of how decentralized internet technologies make a significant social impact. The alliance has already produced an in-depth guide on dVPN exit nodes, to inform and protect users who run them. 

Our own product owner Jaro Šatkevič had this to say about the alliance;

“Fixing our broken internet is a mammoth challenge to take on. If we’re to undo decades of centralization and corporatisation, we need typically competing projects to work together. Just like decentralized, peer to peer technologies depend on people coming together for a common purpose, our cause unites teams who are dedicated to making the internet a more accessible and safe public space for every netizen.”

The alliance is founded upon a dedication to the following principles in Web 3 development; open source, permissionless, distributed logs, peer to peer and privacy. A collaboration on multi-network relays and multi-hop solutions is currently in development.

Explore the alliance here, and read the manifesto.