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Windows and Mac Node installation instructions

Install Windows or Macbook VPN to run your Mysterium node

  1. Begin by downloading the file – MysteriumVPN MAC / MysteriumVPN WIN
  2. Install MysteriumVPN.
  3. Start Mysterium VPN.
  4. Accept our terms and conditions in the app.
  5. Choose on the top a button “Run Service”. There you can choose whitelisted or All Traffic and press a button “Start service”. You can always check your active connections on our testnet.
  6. To look up your Mysterium ID and Add your ETH wallet, on the top right corner you will find a button “ID“.

Bellow Start/Stop service button you can press “View dashboard” and find your node in testnet.
Or, you can do this by copying your ID and pinging the URL: https://testnet.mysterium.network/ [your ID here] /Openvpn


If you are able, to check your node and you will notice “Connecting…” and no changes happening, please report this to our Mysterium Node Testing channel. We will help you as this issue comes from the router.

Earn up to $600 per year in ETH for selling your unused internet

Mysterium Node Pilot

UPDATE 24/10/2019:
We have updated terms to our node pilot and you can find these, and a whole lot more node support, at: help.mysterium.network.

***

 

Sell your spare bandwidth whenever it suits you and earn ETH! (And in case you haven’t yet, learn all there is to know about being a node here.)

How much can you make? 

Most of the internet you pay for goes to waste, sitting idle or completely unused.

Join our network by running a node and earn up to $50 worth of ETH per month. That’s $600 per year!

We calculate your bandwidth contributions using the following hourly rate: 0 – 30 days: (0 – 720 hours): $0.07 /h

Please note that to receive your bounty payout you must run your node for at least 24 hours per month, with a minimum reserved upload speed of 5 Mbps.

You can see your stats on our Testnet.

Get started by downloading our node software or ordering our Raspberry Pi node starter kit.

Who can participate?

These bounty payouts are currently available for nodes based in the US, UK, Germany, and Italy. We’re working hard to include other countries over the following months. 

Mysterium Referral Program

We’ve also just rolled out a node referral program for the UK, where you can earn even more ETH by introducing new nodes to our network. 

Create your referral code, and reach out directly to sharmini@mysterium.network to find out how you can start onboarding nodes and educating your local community about decentralization.

 

✌️& 💜

Team Mysterium

Raspberry Pi Node installation instructions

Install the prebuilt Raspberry image to run your Mysterium node

  1. Download the image directly form “mystberry.zip” (look for latest release and expand “Assets)
  2. Write an image to the SD card (macOS):

●  Download balenaEtcher tool for SD hard flashing

●  Connect your SD card to your computer

●  Open balanaEtcher, select your image (mystberry.img) and install. This should take 2­-3min.

      3. Setup Raspberry Pi in the following order:

  1. Insert the microSD card into your Raspberry Pi
  2. Connect Ethernet cable
  3. Connect power source

To find out your Raspberry Pi local IP address (you have to be in the same network):

  1. Download free LanScan app for macOS. For windows, you can use any other lanscan app.
  2. Start LanScan and search for Vendor “Raspberry Pi Foundation”
  3. Copy/paste the IP address
  4. Open Google Chrome and paste “yourIPadress:4449”
  5. You will be asked to type in name and password:

Name: myst
Password: mystberry

Get started -> Provide VPN -> Start service

  1. You can view and add all needed information in this Client System program, such as your Myst ID, ETH wallet address and referral code (if you have been referred by someone).

That’s it! You should be up and running. For help on setting up your node, please join our Telegram group.

For more support and help, check out help.mysterium.network

The definitive guide to being a Mysterium node

If you’re new to Mysterium Network, welcome! You’ve stumbled upon a new era of the internet. 

Mysterium is one of the many projects pioneering decentralization. We’re building the world’s largest peer to peer bandwidth marketplace to power the Web 3. Together we are rewiring the internet so it’s faster, safer and more accessible for all. 

We’re here to show you how easy it is to do three things: 

  1. Earn cryptocurrency 
  2. Protect your online privacy & security 
  3. Decentralize the internet 

First up - rent your unused bandwidth and earn cryptocurrency.

If you’re reading this article, then you have an internet connection. But did you know that most of the internet you pay for goes to waste, sitting idle or completely unused? By becoming a Mysterium node you can share your spare internet bandwidth with a global community of other nodes, spreading your connection even further. 

What is a node? 

In a peer-to-peer network like Mysterium’s, a node represents a single device, such as your computer, which helps power and maintain that network. Through your node, you can voluntarily contribute your internet or computing resources, such as bandwidth or processing power. You share it directly with the entire network without any kind of official host or authority needed. That’s the beauty of blockchain.

Anyone can easily become a node by doing either of these things:

  1. Buy a Raspberry Pi device, plug it into your router and simply switch it on. Then head to My.Mysterium.Network to register your node.
  2. Download our easy to use node app designed for Mac or Windows.

More detail:

A Raspberry Pi is a small hardware device that functions as your Mysterium node. Your Ethererum wallet address is tied to it, so it’s as simple as plug, play and earn. Read all about them here.

You can join our Raspberry Pi node pilot if you’re in the US, UK, Germany and Italy and earn up to $600 worth of ETH in a year.

And the cherry (or raspberry :p) on top? We’ve just rolled out a node referral program for the UK, so you will be rewarded when you introduce new nodes to our network.

Create your referral code and reach out directly to sharmini@mysterium.network to find out how you can start onboarding nodes and educating your local community about decentralization.

We make it easy to become part of the new token economy. If you want to learn more ways to earn crypto easily, check out our post listing 14 ways to earn cryptocurrency.

Then - enjoy (and power) the world’s first decentralised, free VPN.

As we’ve already discussed, when you become a node, you join and power our network. Our node network is completely run by and for the people. You share your internet resources with a global community and are rewarded with ETH. 

But our node network can do lots of other cool things, like power its own global, free VPN! 

You can either be in node-mode to power the VPN and earn tokens, or be in VPN-mode to use it. With most VPNs, you have to pay for a subscription to use their service. With Mysterium, you get paid for being the service.

Because it’s decentralised, our VPN is far more secure, with no single point of attack or failure. We encrypt your data and use layered protection protocols built to defend both people and organizations. You can browse anonymously, with your identity and IP always hidden, avoiding unethical surveillance and cyberattacks. 

We also whitelist everyone who wants to become nodes or access our VPN network. Whitelisting is where we create a list of IP addresses that we trust to use our domains or service. It’s a security feature that allows us to limit and control access to Mysterium, protecting you and the entire network from bad players. 

And while other VPNs offer online security, in many cases they still can – and do – maintain logs. Because of our decentralized architecture, it’s impossible for us to store your data or log your traffic. Instead, all your traffic is distributed across the entire network, with no single node having the full picture of who you are or what you’re up to.

Now relax - you’re already decentralizing internet.

The best part about being a node is that technically it is YOU fighting online censorship, surveillance and cybercrime. 

For many of us, the internet is a place to freely roam. But many online citizens are trapped behind digital walls, stopping the free flow of ideas, voices and truths. 

Our founder wrote a great piece about the internet before it was hijacked by governments and selfish corporations, and what we can do to reclaim and protect it now.  

As a node, you lend others your digital freedom. You help a global community rewire the internet, safeguarding freedom of speech and anonymous expression online. 

Join the fastest growing community decentralizing and democratising the web, one node at a time. 

Sign up here or download the Web3 revolution. 

What is the Mysterium Node Pilot?

UPDATE 24/10/2019:
We have updated some terms of our node pilot and you can find them, and a whole lot more node support, at: help.mysterium.network.

****

 

Through our Mysterium Node Pilot, we invite and incentivise a global community to help us with testing a product that needs to operate in a home environment (hence multiple edge cases).

This R&D initiative will help us with rigorous feedback loops and fixing bugs as we go to market with our Raspberry Pi, Mac and Windows products.

What we are trying to achieve

Managing Expectations — Only nodes directly contacted by Mysterium to join our pilot will earn.

Simply signing up for the Node Pilot does not guarantee any earnings.

We have specific criteria which you must meet in order to be accepted into the pilot program. This critera may evolve depending on how the product and business are performing due to market inputs or technological challenges.

We are selecting nodes for our closed pilot based on their prior performance within the network, so we encourage you to run a stable node and wait to hear from us.

By taking part in the Mysterium Node Pilot you will become one of the pioneers of web 3. You will also be first in line for paid traffic as we onboard B2B partners and bring income into the network.

Current Terms for Node Pilot

The Mysterium Node Pilot helps us with testing our software within home environments. One of our goals as an organisation is to build a global network of residential IPs.

The next step for us is to test how our nodes work in the US, UK, Germany and Italy. 

With this in mind, we’re making some refinements to the terms of our Node Pilot.

 

How much can you earn?

Are you based in the US, UK, Italy or Germany? Then you’re eligible to participate in our pilot program with Raspberry Pi. 

By running a Raspberry Pi node you can earn up to $50 worth of ETH per month and $600 per year!

We will calculate your bandwidth contributions by an hourly rate. (Please note the minimum reserved upload speed for the device is 5 Mbps)

* 0 – 30 days: (0 – 720 hours): $0.07 p/h

Please note that to receive your bounty payout you must run your node for at least 24 hours per month, with a minimum reserved upload speed of 5 Mbps.

You can see your stats on our Testnet.

 

Referral Program

We’ve also just rolled out a node referral program for the UK, where you can earn even more ETH by introducing new nodes to our network.

Create your referral code, and reach out directly to sharmini@mysterium.network to find out how you can start onboarding nodes and educating your local community about decentralization.


Want to stay in the know? Subscribe to our newsletter.

Connect with our project

Please be sure to follow and subscribe to the following:

Website — https://mysterium.network
Twitter — https://twitter.com/MysteriumNet
Telegram — https://t.me/Mysterium_Network
Reddit — https://www.reddit.com/r/MysteriumNetwork
Facebook — https://www.facebook.com/MysteriumNet
Steemit — https://steemit.com/@mysteriumnetwork
Bitcointalk — https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=1895626.0

Please join the Telegram groups most relevant to you and engage with our team. We want to hear from you.

English — https://t.me/Mysterium_Network

Rules & FAQ — https://t.me/MysteriumRulesAndFAQ

Announcements — https://t.me/MysteriumOfficialAnnouncements

Node Testing — https://t.me/mysterium_network_nodes

MysteriumVPN Testing — https://t.me/joinchat/I5-aG0z_3SA6PLgQBCOXlA

中文 / Chinese — https://t.me/MysteriumChineseChat

русский / Russian https://t.me/mystRU

Español / Spanish — https://t.me/mysterium_network_espanol

And finally, if you’d like to see more of these types of updates give us some claps and let us know.

*WireGuard” and the “WireGuard” logo are registered trademarks of Jason A. Donenfeld.

What happened to the Internet?

In its very early days, the Internet was decentralised. It was a public place where computers spoke to each other directly. Anyone could build upon open protocols that were governed by a small community of users — just like Mysterium Network (sign up for our closed node runner pilot).

This accessibility invited companies to contribute, to experiment, and develop fast. Direct peer to peer file sharing was born during this time, in the late 90s. The first Internet businesses began to emerge, and they soon abandoned the open protocol design in place of their own centralized alternatives.

The Internet today is now governed by a handful of these businesses. Tech empires — Google, Amazon, Apple, Yahoo, Facebook — with their privately owned servers and infrastructure power the web for everyone. With this power comes unchallenged and uncapped control. If the Internet were a nation state, it would not be a democracy.

“If the Internet were a nation state, it would not be a democracy.”

While they operate mostly in the online domain, the decisions and actions of these tech giants affect our privacy, security, our access to information and to each other. Their carefully programmed algorithms design our world view, and most of our news is filtered through very few platforms. We can only trust that Google will act ethically as a gatekeeper to the world’s information. Facebook has already betrayed our trust, yet we continue to log in each day without any reasonable alternative. The internet, which is “owned” by no one, has been monopolised.

Governments and their agencies have attempted to exert some sort of influence and keep these companies in check. Legislations like the GDPR are meant to protect us, but the laws which govern the privacy of our personal data have largely benefited corporate needs.

“We pay Internet Service Providers to get us online, yet they continue to sabotage our privacy in exchange for greater returns.”

The trouble with centralisation

The flaws with a centralised internet are deeply embedded within its infrastructure:

  1. Servers are vulnerable to hacks or network failure
  2. Our personal data is readily available for advertisers
  3. Content is blocked or censored against our will.

“We have normalised the trading of our privacy in exchange for convenient services”

We pay Internet Service Providers to get us online, yet they continue to sabotage our privacy in exchange for greater returns. Your every email, purchase, google search, upload and friend request is translated into data that is collected and stored in their centralised servers. All this personal information is monetised without your knowledge, your online habits and movements sold to advertisers and businesses who thrive off our profiles. Just this week, Bloomberg reported that businesses can buy information about our locations and movements with ease.

These servers are regularly hacked and sensitive data leaked, often without real consequence. In 2018 alone, over one billion people were victim to these data breaches. You may have been affected without knowing (but you can check using certain tools, including this one).

What’s more concerning is the ease with which governments can access this same information. Tech companies allow the NSA to access their servers and collect data through formalised arrangements. The UK’s Snoopers Charter grants the government the right to legally monitor the internet usage of its citizens.

We have normalised the trading of our privacy in exchange for convenient services, forgetting that it is a basic human right. The UN urges the protection of our privacy and anonymity online to evade the grasp of “broad and intrusive government surveillance.”

Part of the Charter of Human Rights is the fundamental right of freedom of expression, which encompasses the freedom to “to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.” Yet many jurisdictions around the world confine their citizens within digital walls, inhibiting the free flow of truths and voices. This online censorship erodes democracy and equality in the real world.

The Web3 revolution starts with you

We’re now entering a new era of the internet, one which honours its original, decentralised roots.

“To decentralise the internet is to democratise it”

New technology offers us an opportunity to re-engineer the foundations of the web today; it withdraws commercial influence and government control, distributing this power among users instead. To decentralise the internet is to democratise it — to break apart the infrastructure of a corporately managed internet, and assign this responsibility to us.

Blockchain has already begun facilitating this through its democratic and self-governing architecture. Instead of centralised servers, we can create peer to peer systems which allow people, not business, to securely store and share information online.

Anyone can be a part of this decentralised system. Your computer becomes a node, acting as a miniature server. This means it can help power the entire network by directly sharing its excess resources, such as bandwidth or processing power. We can do this without any kind of official host or authority at all — and be paid for it. The bigger this distributed network grows, the stronger and faster it becomes, and a bandwidth marketplace can flourish.

An internet powered by people is the next stage of its technological and social evolution. An ambitious few have already started to jumpstart this transformation. The creator and “father” of the Internet himself, Tim Berners-Lee, is now the co-lead of the Decentralized Information Group at MIT, working to reverse the trend of centralisation and restore “net neutrality”.

“An internet powered by people is the next stage of its technological and social evolution.”

Momentum is building. Countless other entrepreneurial teams around the world are building the decentralised applications (dApps) and open-source tools which will empower a global community of users to govern and sustain the internet.

What can a node network “do”? A dVPN use case

A strong node network can solve the failings of our centralised internet. One of its many real-world applications is in being the foundation of a strong, community-run VPN.

Think of a VPN as a failsafe against the various threats which undermine an open and democratic internet. It allows you to connect to servers located around the world, hiding your IP address and identity — a technological remedy for censorship, surveillance and firewalls.

Yet common VPNs utilise servers that are centrally owned and run by businesses, and they can store logs of all your traffic without anyone knowing. You have to trust that they won’t do anything with this data, nor that they’ll hand it over to authorities if asked to. While some of your data may be encrypted, lots of it can still be revealed.

We can instead leverage decentralised networks so that your encrypted data is sharded into separate pieces and filtered in an unrecognisable form through a distributed node network — without the possibility of being traced or censored. A single node will never be able to identify you or your online activities, nor can authorities and third parties.

In its decentralised form, a VPN pays people (nodes) for providing the service. And as with a decentralised internet, a decentralised VPN has no single point of failure or attack, making it more robust than centralised options. It creates a secure and accessible online space, enhances user privacy in the truest sense, and is strengthened by the mutual trust and shared interests of a global community looking out for each other.

Become a Mysterium Node Runner

https://mysterium.network/node/

Decentralisation still has a way to go. It may take decades for the internet to migrate onto a P2P network, but we are already crafting the tools to make it a reality. We can rewire the internet so that it becomes a public domain once again — a space for new ideas, collaboration and connection.

This is just the beginning. You can help us democratise the web, one node at a time.

Join our node pilot by downloading our node for Windows, Mac and Raspberry Pi.

MysteriumVPN app for mobile Android now available

Mysterium Network is a fast and scalable transport security layer. Mysterium is reinventing privacy, starting with decentralizing VPN on blockchain which means that our architecture can’t actually keep logs of your traffic. Instead, your traffic data is distributed across the network with no single node having complete access to who you are and what you are doing. We have been open source from day one. Everything is transparent. You can check our source code and even contribute.

As we continue our mission to create a distributed, trust-less and sustainable network providing open access and privacy to all Internet users; our MysteriumVPN app is now available for mobile Android phones on the Google Play store. Anyone will be able to participate in the world’s first decentralized blockchain VPN network from the convenience of their Android phones and compatible devices. You can download the app and use for free during our alpha testing (also available for Windows and macOS desktop versions). Help us build, improve and continue to reinvent privacy, security and freedom on the Internet by providing your feedback.

The app is built with P2P architecture with focus on highest privacy and anonymity using powerful AES-256 encryption, reputation mechanisms, and layered protection protocols. MysteriumVPN secures your data communication channel by utilizing highest-grade AES-256 encryption with SHA384 cryptographic hashing.

MysteriumVPN app for mobile Android

The MysteriumVPN mobile app uses the OpenVPN protocol. OpenVPN is a open-source commercial software that implements virtual private network techniques to create secure point-to-point or site-to-site connections in routed or bridged configurations and remote access facilities. It uses a custom security protocol that utilizes SSL/TLS for key exchange. Future versions of the MysteriumVPN app will also integrate the WireGuard ® protocol as well.

MysteriumVPN node country Search

The first version of the app for Android will include basic functionality that will allow browsing through and connection to the list of available node countries in the decentralized network TestNet. You can also help provide a secure connection to those in need by hosting your own VPN node. You will be able to see your current IP address and connection status at the top of the screen. The bottom part of the screen shows connectivity statistics like session time duration and amount of traffic received and sent. Other functionality includes a Favorites feature (by marking the star icon) so that you can save your preferred connections for quick and easy access.

MysteriumVPN connected

Quick Access screen shortcut

The MysteriumVPN quick access screen shortcut is available at the top of the mobile phone screen in the Notifications area.

MysteriumVPN quick access screen shortcut

Quick Access screen

You can quickly and easily DISCONNECT your current VPN session in the quick access screen. Session statistics can also be conveniently seen here for monitoring.

MysteriumVPN quick access screen

Feedback form

Selecting the ? question mark icon at the top left of the main app screen opens the Feedback form. Select desired Feedback type (Bug, Connectivity issues, Positive feedback), enter Message and click on the SEND FEEDBACK button to help our team with the development process by providing us with valuable data.

MysteriumVPN Feedback form

You can also help by providing your feedback and interacting with our community. You can join our MysteriumVPN Telegram Testing group for support and communicating with our team to share your experience and thoughts.

The open source code for the mobile app will be available in our GitHub. For iPhone and iOS users we will have that version of the app available in Q1 of 2019. Additional future developments include advanced filtering for improved node country selection. We also have payment flows such as top up your identity, withdraw from your identity and micro-payments for bandwidth coming soon.

*”WireGuard” and the “WireGuard” logo are registered trademarks of Jason A. Donenfeld.

Links

Please be sure to follow and subscribe to the following:

Website — https://mysterium.network
Twitter — https://twitter.com/MysteriumNet
Telegram — https://t.me/Mysterium_Network
Reddit — https://www.reddit.com/r/MysteriumNetwork
Facebook — https://www.facebook.com/MysteriumNet
Steemit — https://steemit.com/@mysteriumnetwork
Bitcointalk — https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=1895626.0

A look under the hood of a decentralised VPN Application.

MysteriumVPN is the client application of Mysterium Network, a project focused on providing security and privacy to web 3 applications.

In this article, we will discuss the architecture of MysteriumVPN and how it integrates with Mysterium Node to ensure an encrypted end to end flow of data through Mysterium Network.

Cross-platform architecture

Usually, you need separate builds for each platform. Now that cross-platform technology has improved, this is no longer the case.

For desktop:

Electron is a framework which allows us to build cross-platform applications using common web technologies such as HTML, CSS and Javascript. We are using Electron which allows us to develop one application for two platforms for desktop — Windows and Mac OS. Linux coming soon. Download our alpha.

Under the hood of an Electron application, sits a Chromium browser; A website, rendered by an embedded browser.

For mobile:

We are kicking off our mobile development for MysteriumVPN, with Android versions set to release shortly.

For this, we are using React Native for cross-platform applications.

Most of MysteriumVPN is written in Javascript, which is run in a separate process. Javascript generates the virtual structure of the user interface. This Javascript process communicates to native mobile processes which are responsible for rendering the actual user interface as you see it.

The architecture of MysteriumVPN Desktop Client Application

How MysteriumVPN works on desktop:

Since we are using Electron, we have two processes, MAIN and RENDERER.

MAIN is the first process which is started when the application starts. It is a NodeJS process which is responsible for managing the following functions:

  • Application state and internal operations
  • Tray

  • Kicking off the RENDERER process

The second process is RENDERER and it is responsible for displaying the graphical user interface for the application.

Communication between processes:

Both the MAIN and RENDERER processes need to communicate with each other to stay in sync. For this reason, we are using a standard approach of Inter-Process Communication (IPC).

Javascript is not type-safe, which isn’t very reliable. We use Flow static type checker which adds type-safety for Javascript. This especially applies to syncing data between processes — it becomes less reliable when using out-of-the-box IPC. To improve that, with custom implementation on top to have type-safety.

MessageTransport describes a single typed message which is sent between processes. It creates alignment between both processes by introducing sender and receiver objects, ensuring that both sides expect the same arguments of this message.

Here is an implementation:

class MessageTransport<T> {
 _channel: string
 _messageBus: MessageBus
constructor (channel: string, messageBus: MessageBus) {
 this._channel = channel
 this._messageBus = messageBus
 }
buildSender (): MessageSender<T> {
 return new MessageSender(this._channel, this._messageBus)
 }
buildReceiver (): MessageReceiver<T> {
 return new MessageReceiver(this._channel, this._messageBus)
 }
}
class MessageSender<T> {
 _channel: string
 _messageBus: MessageBus
constructor (channel: string, messageBus: MessageBus) {
 this._channel = channel
 this._messageBus = messageBus
 }
send (data: T) {
 this._messageBus.send(this._channel, data)
 }
}
class MessageReceiver<T> {
 _channel: string
 _messageBus: MessageBus
constructor (channel: string, messageBus: MessageBus) {
 this._channel = channel
 this._messageBus = messageBus
 }
on (callback: T => void) {
 this._messageBus.on(this._channel, callback)
 }
removeCallback (callback: T => void) {
 this._messageBus.removeCallback(this._channel, callback)
 }
}

Here is an example of communication between both these MAIN and RENDERER processes:

Example: communicating country proposal updates between processes:

MAIN process is managing country proposals internally and it sends all updates:

this._countryList.onUpdate(countries => {
  this._communication.countryUpdate.send(countries)
})

RENDERER process listens for country updates,

this.rendererCommunication.countryUpdate.on(this.onCountriesUpdate)
...
onCountriesUpdate (countries) {
  this.countriesAreLoading = false
  this.countryList = countries
}

Having such an abstraction layer ensures that communication is type-safe, reliable and features around it are simple to test.

How do we integrate Mysterium Node with MysteriumVPN Application?

Once we’ve rendered the application layer, we still need to connect MysteriumVPN to Mysterium Node. Mysterium Nodeis a software that connects you to Mysterium Network where you are able to exchange value for bandwidth.

MysteriumVPN is a client application of Mysterium Network. The successful running of our dVPN on the network will attract other use cases from existing or future businesses that require end-to-end encryption of data, thereby expanding Mysterium Network’s ecosystem.

We require specific information to ensure the successful running of our dVPNservice.

Operation System Service
Since we are running Mysterium Node under the MysteriumVPN application we need to supervise the Mysterium Node to ensure that it works.

Our Data Protection Policy
We make a clear distinction between personal data and usage data. We do not collect information on who you are. We collect data on session and connection inputs and outputs. This is important data for us as it gives us visibility on how our technology fares against the realities of cyber oppression. Check out our privacy policy for more information.

Logging
Since we are integrating Mysterium Node into the MysteriumVPN application, the application itself gets quite complex. That’s why we have to be prepared to log errors from everywhere, — our application, Mysterium Node, and from Electron.

That means that there are three sources of inputs. When we are inspecting something, we need to understand that these errors can happen in three different places. We need to synchronise those and collect all relevant data from these sources.

Data management in the era of web 3 is complex and we hope to do so in an ethical and fair manner. Check out how our no logs policy protects your personal data.

Build on Mysterium Network

We have an npm package that allows for you to connect to Mysterium Nodeeasily. This is the same package that the MysteriumVPN uses to connect to Mysterium Network. This can be used for any application — it’s literally plug and play.

Interested in contributing to Mysterium Network? We are an open source project focused on bringing privacy, security and freedom to web 3. Check out our Github.

Please beware of scams. We will never ask you for your private keys.

X myStickymenu