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Mysterium Network begins token migration

Mysterium Network begins its official token migration today, 31st August 2020. This will be a 1:1 token migration, so no new tokens will be created. Legacy tokens will not be supported in the network, so you will need to migrate your tokens before topping up in-app.

Here’s the new MYST token address: 0x4Cf89ca06ad997bC732Dc876ed2A7F26a9E7f361 

Узнать больше about how the Mysterium Network token migration moves the project towards peer to peer payments on the Ethereum blockchain.

What is Mysterium BetaNet?

Mysterium BetaNet is the first iteration of peer to peer payments within Mysterium Network: 

  • MYST as a means of value exchange in the network 
  • Payments are settled on the Ethereum blockchain 
  • It’s our second stage towards Mysterium Mainnet.

Mysterium Network is running an opt-in BetaNet. Mysterium Network will not be migrating TestNet users to BetaNet at this stage. VPN services continue to be accessible on Mysterium TestNet.

Sign up to take part in Mysterium BetaNet.

What should MYST token holders do?

MYST token holders are encouraged to migrate their tokens at their earliest convenience.  

Though there is no deadline on the migration, you will not be able to access VPN services within Mysterium Network using legacy MYST. 

If your MYST is held in a decentralised exchange or in a wallet, you will have to migrate your tokens yourself. Please follow the token migration guide. 

If you have your tokens stored on HitBTC, they will be migrated for you. The Mysterium Team is currently working with their team and will provide updates as we progress.

MYST token migration guide

Migrating a token is simply to upgrade the smart contract of that token. In the case of Mysterium, we are upgrading legacy MYST (pure ERC20) to new MYST (ERC20 with `permit`: 712-signed token approvals).

This is a 1:1 token migration so there will be no new tokens created.

How will MYST token migration work? 

From 31st of August, MYST token holders will be able to start migrating their tokens into the new token standard. This will become the standard MYST token used within Mysterium Network’s payment system. All exchanges are informed and are preparing for the upgrade on their end. If you are holding MYST on HitBTC exchange, the migration will be done automatically and you will not need to do anything. 

If you are storing your MYST tokens outside the exchanges, you will have to conduct the migration yourself. In essence, you will need to initiate a transaction from your wallet address which holds MYST tokens into our current token smart contract address and call an upgrade function upgrade(uint256 value) there.

Note:

  • While there will be no time limit for migrating tokens, please be aware that only the new token standard will be used in the Mysterium Network payment system and actively traded on exchanges. However, you will not lose your original MYST tokens if you do not migrate within a specific deadline. This means you can perform your token migration at a convenient time to you. Your wallets which are supporting ERC20 tokens will work fine with the upgraded MYST token as well. 
  • During the upgrade transaction, legacy MYST tokens will be burned and new MYST will be created and sent to the same address.
  • You can do migration in parts, so no worry if after migration someone sends you legacy MYST tokens. You will be able to migrate them as well.
  • The MYST migration process has no time limit. If anyone in the future sends you legacy MYST, you will be able to migrate them at any point in time.

Do I need to have ETH on the address where my MYST tokens are in order to migrate them successfully?

You need a small amount of ETH on the same address where your MYST tokens are in order to pay for gas fees on the Ethereum network. Due to high transaction fees on Ethereum blockchain, we recommend having at least 5 USD of ETH there. You can check average gas fees before starting the migration here.

Token migration steps

Where should I store my MYST tokens and how do I manually migrate them?

The token migration process includes several options – MetaMask, Etherscan or MyEtherWallet (MEW). Through MyEtherWallet you can use:

  • Ledger (also possible to use with MetaMask and Etherscan)
  • Trezor (also possible to use with MetaMask and Etherscan)
  • Digital Bitbox
  • Secalot
  • Keystore / JSON File
  • Mnemonic phrase / seed
  • Private key

Token Migration using My Ether Wallet (MEW)

If your MYST tokens are stored in one of the above forms, please select MEW when you reach the step where you need to select the wallet that stores your MYST tokens. Once you have synchronised your wallet with MEW, you can start now with the token migration process:

  1. Go to the home page of https://myetherwallet.com
  2. Click on “Send > Send Transaction”
  3. Select ETH as a type of token to send and enter the 0 as amount
  4. Enter the address of the legacy MYST token smart contract:  0xa645264C5603E96c3b0B078cdab68733794B0A71
  5. Enable “Data & Gas Limit” under Advanced options
  6. Add your payload data (use payload generation tool)

  7. Click on “Send Transaction”.
  8. You new tokens will be visible on new MYST smart contract address: 0x4Cf89ca06ad997bC732Dc876ed2A7F26a9E7f361

 

Token Migration using Etherscan

You are also able to migrate your tokens via Etherscan and interact with the contract directly.

  1. Go to the token contract page directly https://etherscan.io/address/0xa645264C5603E96c3b0B078cdab68733794B0A71
  2. Navigate to the “Write Contract” tab on the Contract page.
  3. Connect to a Web3 provider, such as MetaMask, Fortmatic or Portis. You can connect a hardware wallet such as Trezor or Ledger to your MetaMask extension, and thus interact without MYST leaving your hardware wallet.
  4. Find upgrade function in the list and type in the amount of tokens you’d like to migrate. NOTE: legacy MYST token had 8 zeros, so to migrate 123,05 MYST, you should type: 12305000000.
  5. Metamask will show popup, adjust gas fee and make a transaction. After the transaction is mined, your new tokens will be visible on the new MYST smart contract address: 0x4Cf89ca06ad997bC732Dc876ed2A7F26a9E7f361

High Ethereum transaction fees, and what that means for Mysterium Network

Ethereum transaction fees spike, affecting dapp user onboarding

As we all know the market is changing. The DeFi bubble has led to insane Ethereum transaction fees

But it isn’t just decentralized exchanges that are being hit by this spike in GAS prices. Decentralised applications building within the Ethereum ecosystem is having to go back to the drawing board.

As you can see in the chart above, you can see that this a problem that is here to stay. 

Take for example the impact of a $3 transaction fee with a median expected top-up value between $3 – $10. Using a dex would incur an even higher transaction fee. So in some cases transaction fee can be as big as topup value, such situation is a point of friction in our user onboarding process. 

In the long term, there will be widespread and commonly accepted layer two solutions for the decentralised community that will solve for these spikes in the transaction fees on Ethereum. This could be ETH 2.0 or a widely adopted second layer solution based on payment channels. 

But this isn’t the current case. As a team committed to user onboarding, we put serious time and thinking into how we can alleviate this friction point for users within Mysterium Network.

What about other blockchains?

We have taken time to consider other blockchains and analyse if this is a solution to the transaction fee problem. There are several EVM compatible solutions such as RSK, Tron, TomoChain, just to name a few.

In case you were wondering…

There are endless solutions which are just as promising when it comes to cheap and fast transactions, for example, EOS, Liquid, Stellar, Nano, Holo, and the list goes on…


Here are some of our reasons for our continued commitment to the Ethereum blockchain: 

  • The Ethereum ecosystem holds a large community of users who know how to use Ethereum wallets
  • Integrations with DEXes such as Uniswap, which will allow for ETH, DAI and other ERC 20 token holder communities to easily pay for VPN services within Mysterium Network
  • Proven security model 

Big and growing developer community. As builders, we want to be amongst our own. 

But does this mean we have to live with the high transaction fees? Not necessarily - Introducing “Mysterium Pro”

How does Mysterium Pro solve the transaction fee problem?

The only place where these high transaction fees touch Mysterium Network’s service offering is in the top-up function. All other transactions are happening in our own, scalable micropayment channels based L2 solution. Find out more here:

  1. Introducing payments on Mysterium Network
  2. A deep dive into payments on Mysterium Network

This is the moment where end-users top-up their payment channel so they can begin to pay for VPN services within the network. 

With Mysterium Pro, users can circumvent high transaction fees by choosing to top-up their payment channels with BTC, BCH and other low transaction fee tokens. 

Mysterium Pro will also include a solution which batches end-users tokens before converting them to MYST, therefore spreading the cost of transaction fees over users. This allow means mucheven cheaper top-ups for Mysterium Pro users.

Mysterium Pro launches after our mainnet release. See our latest update on MYST token migration.

Want to get involved in Mysterium Network today?

We’re building towards Ethereum mainnet. This is when peer to peer payments within Mysterium Network become a reality. As part of this, we are recruiting testers for our beta net, a place where we will work with our community to battle test our code.

Here’s a snapshot of our progressive migration onto Ethereum mainnet: 

If you’re interested in getting involved, sign up here!

Want to get involved in Mysterium Network today?

Mysterium Network is a decentralized VPN, with a growing global residential IP node network. Download our apps to browse the internet freely.

What is the Web 3.0?

Will all technology eventually become obsolete, replaced or abandoned? Or are some things so deeply rooted in our world that they can only evolve, just as we do? 

It’s hard to imagine the internet as a technology of the industrial revolution. This giant and permanently entangled web of wires, routers, servers, towers, and electric currents passes information at a speed somewhere between that of sound and light.

This internet infrastructure exists everywhere, a cloud that lets us carry “the web” in our pockets and power our homes with smart devices. It’s no longer one technology, but an undefinable mesh of countless technologies, protocols, software and hardware, interoperating and speaking to each other.

We are all now connected by the Internet, like a neurons in a giant brain.

stephen hawking
Hundreds of thousands of kilometers of submarine cables connect us, but will these age well? 

And yet the internet we know today - referred to as the Web 2.0 - is falling apart.

Over-centralization has become a threat to its accessibility and democracy. Officially governed by “no one”, the internetit has flourished into a commercial machine which serves a handful of powerful and self-interested businesses. Corrupt governments can cut off their citizens from the internet altogether. And if your personal data hasn’t been hacked yet, it’s only a matter of time

But rebuilding the internet itself seems an impossible task. Instead, we can decentralise it.

New technology can help change how we build business, how we design our governance systems, and how we operate global organisations.

Juan Benet

The decentralisation of the web is a global movement, led by many different groups all working towards the same objective; to ensure equal, free and uncensored access to the web for all. We do this by taking the same physical pieces that make up the internet today, and repurpose them so they protect and serve users.

Before, we were merely plugged into the internet. Now we can become the internet itself.

Important sidenote – the internet and the web are two different things; when we refer to the internet, we mean the physical infrastructure – the wiring and protocols governing how computers communicate with each other. The “web” is made up of websites, web applications, web browsing. It’s a platform which hosts documents and applications, with clickable hyperlinks.

Weaving the World Wide Web

Before we dive into Web 3.0 and its mechanics, let’s take a brief look at the history of the internet.

In its early stages, the internet was made up of a distributed network of computers. Its original architects, including founding father Tim Berners-Lee, envisioned it as inclusive and open. To access and be part of this network meant to contribute directly to its growth and development, with everyone sharing responsibility equally. Each user could communicate with each other directly, without the need for third parties or businesses, such as ISPs today. 

Towards the end 1990, the first web page became available on the open internet. In 

1991, this Web 1.0 was launched as a public domain, a digital and shared space like a public library or park. Users anywhere were invited to join this new online community.

In the mind of Berners-Lee, the internet was designed to be “a collaborative medium, a place where we [could] all meet and read and write.” But as more people connected and the network grew in size, Berners-Lee understood that to unlock the power of the internet, it had to be “permissionless”, meaning no one had to seek permission to join. 

Had the technology been proprietary, and in my total control, it would probably not have taken off. You can’t propose that something be a universal space and at the same time keep control of it.

Tim Berners-Lee

However, the web at this time was mostly static, offering read-only content. There were very few content creators, with most users of the internet “acting as consumers”. The internet was soon taken over by the first internet businesses like AOL and Yahoo, who became the gateways to the web.

In 1994, Netscape launched the first commercial-grade web browser, and the dot-com explosion began. 

Web 2.0 - Users at the bottom of the internet foodchain

In the early 2000s, the internet became more interactive. The evolution of the read-only Web 1.0 to the read-write Web 2.0 brought us the “web as a platform”. Users could easily start creating and publishing content themselves, even learning HTML (HyperText Markup Language, the markup language for the web) to build their own websites. 

As an interactive and dynamic system where anyone could participate, this read-write web is what catalysed the birth of many new systems and applications which today have become some of the biggest businesses in the world. Participatory social networks like Facebook and Myspace, online marketplaces like Amazon, AirBnB and Uber, content creation and entertainment – all these plug into Web 2.0, creating new economies and standards for socialising, communication and business. Social media in particular has reinvented the way we shop and consume news.

Unfortunately, the business models propping up the internet today are as exploitative as they are successful. It exists to serve those “who have something to sell”, who even in the 90’s were predicted to become the main beneficiaries of the web. Companies rely on user-generated content to keep their platforms running, yet our personal data is harvested and sold to companies we’ve never even heard of. 

And if it’s not monetized, our personal information is routinely hacked due to the insecure centralized systems that have led to countless data breaches in the past year alone, exposing millions of records. These centralized databases are gold mines, making us targets for cybercriminals who can steal our personal information, banking details or simply sell our identities on the dark web.

So despite the internet being hailed as the greatest technological advancement of all time, it turns out corporations have really made a mess of things (but earned billions in the process). We desperately need to protect users and preserve the future of the internet itself, before it’s too late to turn things around. 

There are many teams working to restore the internet to its former glory. The resurgence of decentralized, P2P technology has meant we can rewire the internet so that it becomes private, safe and accessible by default. It will protect and compensate users, instead of milking them for data and profit. 

A slight digression… what is the “other” Web 3, the “semantic web” ?

It was once thought that the evolution of the Web 2.0 into Web 3.0 would bring us the “semantic web”. 

The semantic web was to improve web technologies so they can “understand the meaning of words, rather than on keywords or numbers… In this version of the Web 3.0, computers can understand information like humans in order to provide faster and more relevant results. They become more intelligent to satisfy the needs of user.”

Tim Berners-Lee described this web as a “Global Brain” which could process content in a human-like way, interpreting the nuances of concepts and information. Though billions of dollars were invested to develop the semantic web, it has not been brought to life (at least for now).

The decentralized web - a digital rebellion

The best way to think of the Web is as a direct-to-customer distribution channel, whether it's for information or commerce. It bypasses all middlemen. And, it turns out, there are a lot of middlepersons in this society. And they generally tend to slow things down, muck things up, and make things more expensive. The elimination of them is going to be profound.

Steve Jobsin a 1996 interview with Wired, about the impact and future of the Web

The “new” Web 3.0 is often referred to as the decentralised web, as this is the main underlying technological and theoretical standard which powers it. As we shift into a new internet era, this adaptation of the Web 3.0 actually draws it closer to its original roots. 

One of the biggest problems with the internet today is that it is heavily centralized, with a small collection of companies storing and powering the web via privately owned servers. Remember Web 1.0? That was a decentralized system, with a network of computers (and their users) storing that same data. There was no long line of middlemen, queuing up to connect us and take their cut. With that version of the web, no one had to pay a company or service to join, there were no centralized nodes, servers or governance systems, no single point of failure, and no “kill switch”. These are all qualities and components that the decentralized web hopes to restore.

But how does the decentralized web “work”?

The Web 3.0… an inclusive set of protocols to provide building blocks for application makers. Present a whole new way of creating applications. These technologies give users strong and verifiable guarantees about information they are receiving, what information they are giving away, what they are paying and what they are receiving in return.

@GAVofyork

With the introduction of new technologies like blockchain and distributed ledger technology, we can decentralize many different systems that were once dependent on centralized methods. (This can also be applied to systems beyond internet protocols, such as law and economics, but that’s a story for another time.)

Blockchain technology has democratic and self-governing architecture. Take the Bitcoin blockchain, for example; as a peer-to-peer system, it is run by its own users, who are rewarded when they help keep it running. Due to its heavy encryption and clever mechanics, it is practically incorruptible. And the best part is, a blockchain is available for anyone to verify and anyone to join. 

Learning all the lessons of what Bitcoin did to money, we’re starting to do this to all other kinds of services. Torrents and other file sharing sites kickstarted the P2P revolution. Bitcoin entered the scene providing the final piece that was missing all those years ago – incentivisation. Blockchain’s economic model has changed the game, and makes it far more scalable.

And with the advent of smart contract technology, we can ensure the benefits of decentralized protocols are easily passed onto the user. (Smart contracts are pieces of code that can automate and self-execute tasks based on an agreement. And since the smart contract acts as the “middle-man”, it doesn’t need to be paid). 

Now we take these unique protocols and plug them into the web itself. Instead of centralised servers, we can create peer to peer systems which allow people, not business, to securely share and store data online. Your computer becomes a node, acting as a miniature server (node). As a node, you help power the entire network by directly sharing your excess resources, such as bandwidth or processing power. And as a decentralized system, it runs without any kind of official host or authority at all, making it stronger from a security and network health standpoint, with no single point of failure. The bigger this distributed network grows, the faster it becomes.

Learn more about P2P networks

Much, much bigger than the cloud.

You can imagine the decentralized web as a new layer, one which still utilises all the existing infrastructure of the internet today, but “rewires” it on a technical level and reimagines it on a social one. This new layer relies on people, not business, to keep it powered, open and free. In this way, the Web 3 alters the very way we access the internet, retrieve information and operate online. One of the best promises of this tech is its ability to return sovereignty over data ownership. Now we can truly own, protect and profit from our own data. 

And perhaps the most important and new property introduced by the decentralized web is verifiability. It enables any user to verify and confirm the claims of the services they are using. 

We can now check that services are being delivered in the way they’re promised, and that our data is being handled securely.

Pieces of the decentralization puzzle. 

Some Web 3.0 companies.

Much of the decentralized community is already committed to open-sourcing their code, but with Web 3 platforms and apps, this transparency is often built into the technology itself. Verifiability is embedded in the infrastructure. Users no longer have to trust the teams and spokespeople behind the platforms, as the technology itself is trustless by design. This is a far cry from the current state of Web 2.0, where online businesses hide behind terms of service and codes of ethics, and we just have to take their word for it.

P2P privacy

The Web 3.0 enables anyone to build all kinds of autonomous applications and networks. The practical use cases of blockchain and DLT have made their impact on industries from health, law, finance, energy, the sharing economy. 

Mysterium Network is one such network that is helping to weave together this second layer of the internet. As a permissionless, decentralized network with a focus on censorship-resistant web applications, it helps us reformat the web, allowing people like you and me to own and manage the internet. The first app to be utilise the network is a world-first decentralized VPN (dVPN). 

As with other decentralized apps and platforms which make up the Web 3.0, a dVPN service is powered entirely by other web users like you. Each person rents out their IP address and bandwidth to others in this P2P network, earning crypto in exchange. Due to its distributed infrastructure, none of your data can be physically stored anywhere, and all traffic being routed through these personal nodes is heavily encrypted.

You can use this Web 3.0 app to bypass unethical censorship and surveillance. Governments everywhere regularly attempt to prevent the use of encryption tools and anonymity in any form. With over a quarter (27%) of the world’s internet users living in places where they can be arrested for posting, sharing or even “liking” something on Facebook, it’s time to fight back. The Web 3.0 can protect its users, keeping them anonymous while they browse the web openly and safely. 

We don’t have to keep making new privacy tools that can be blocked – we change the very nature of being online in the first place. We’re building safer roads, not inventing safer cars. 

It’s invisible and undeletable internet infrastructure. 

The decentralized web is an equitable and open space where everyone can contribute, build and reap the rewards for themselves. 

You can join it for yourself, just by downloading this app we made just for you 🙂 It’s free to use for only a short while longer.

Learn about the upcoming launch of Mysterium Network on mainnet. 

Building on the bleeding edge

As the Head of Product of Mysterium Network, I am charged with everything from driving micropayments research to delivery of working applications on Android, Windows and Mac.

A regular VPN application is hard enough, but it’s even more challenging when we are seeking to decentralize the infrastructure through which the service is provided. Let’s add peer to peer and blockchain payments into the mix of network security, and you’re bound to have multiple shifting pieces that you’re building upon.

Here’s an update from me as Mysterium Network transitions into Mainnet. 

I first want to quickly reiterate the goal of the MYST token migration.

We were looking to implement an easy way for consumers to top up their dVPN app accounts using ETH and for node runners to withdraw earned MYST into ETH (and maybe even DAI) automagically using a decentralized exchange. We wanted this to happen in a single transaction, so users would have the best possible experience.

ERC777 based token and their callback hooks looked like a good solution for our needs. That’s why we announced the migration of MYST into an ERC777 based token.

Mysterium Network will transition to updated ERC20 token with `permit`: 712-signed token approvals (ERC2612) at the end of August. 

Part of our process gearing up for real payments on Ethereum blockchain included the submission of two versions of our token to our security auditors (both ERC777 and ERC20 +ERC2612 versions). 

Based on feedback from auditors, and our deeper research into current DeFi projects, we are making the decision to par back the scope of our token migration for the moment. 

This is due to several factors. The ERC 777 token standard is a new technology. It was peer-reviewed for two years and finally marked as final on 7 May 2019. The token is extremely advanced and powerful. However, its use in DeFI projects can be dangerous because of some specific vectors of attacks. Even though more popular projects (e.g. Uniswap v2 or Kyber network) are taking steps to be protected against these types of attacks, there are some who may not take such precautions.

In saying that we have found an alternative and less risky solution for achieving all required peer to peer payment system functionality. 

This will involve an upgrade to the ERC20 token with the extension of `permit`: 712-signed token approvals (ERC2612).

What is the ERC2612 standard, and how does it help Mysterium Network? 

ERC2612 is standardising `permit` function which was introduced in DAI token and is now popularised by the Uniswap team.  

So first things first, for the geeks amongst us. If you’re not a developer, feel free to skip past this section. 

What is the permit functionality?

   function permit(address holder, address spender, uint256 value, uint256 deadline, uint8 v, bytes32 r, bytes32 s) external {
       require(deadline >= block.timestamp, 'MYST: Permit expired');
       bytes32 digest = keccak256(
           abi.encodePacked(
               '\x19\x01',
               DOMAIN_SEPARATOR,
               keccak256(abi.encode(PERMIT_TYPEHASH, holder, spender, value, nonces[holder]++, deadline))
           )
       );
       address recoveredAddress = ecrecover(digest, v, r, s);
       require(recoveredAddress != address(0) && recoveredAddress == holder, 'MYST: invalid signature');
       _approve(holder, spender, value);
   }

The function permit extends the ERC20 allowing for the following benefits: 

  • Transactions involving ERC20 operations won’t require ETH and can be paid for by the token itself. 
  • Approve and pull operations happen in a single transaction, instead of two consecutive ones – making the transaction cheaper.  

This means that MYST token holders who don’t own ETH are able to  give permission to smart contracts which would extend the native token functions and allow more advanced operations (similar to those provided in ERC777). This was possible before with `approve` function, but only for ETH holders. Now it becomes possible for various apps where users are not holding ether, e.g. Mysterium dVPN app.

 

Our plans ahead.

Our token migration will commence at the end of August.

TestNet

Mysterium Network is currently running on TestNet, this means that test token payments are happening on Ethereum’s Goerli testnet and node bounty payouts are managed by the Mysterium Team.

BetaNet

We will begin with an invite only BetaNet. During this point, there will be a development freeze on our TestNet. We will be working with a small group of initial testers on our BetaNet. Interested in being a part of the Mysterium Network BetaNet? Use this form to register or jump into our discord channel and let the team know!

The rationale behind an invite only BetaNet is to provide a controlled environment as we transition to real peer to peer payments with MYST on the Ethereum blockchain.

MainNet

Once our team has battle tested our technology during the BetaNet phase, we will merge all the code into master repository on github, deploy final version of smart contracts and update all the apps and services. This will become Mysterium Network MainNet.

Looking into the future

After the token migration and a successful transition onto Ethereum Mainnet, we are planning to integrate with a decentralised exchange, most probably Uniswap v2. This integration with Uniswap will open up app top-ups with ETH for consumers and direct withdrawal to ETH or DAI for node runners as we will have liquidity pools there.

PS: We code golang, and are hiring. If you’re a golang whiz, I’d love to hear from you. Ping me on our discord or send me a message on twitter

Mysterium Network Pre-Mainnet AMA

ICYMI…

We put some Mysterium faces front and center for a pre-launch AMA special. Answering all your questions was founder Robertas, product owner Jaro and head of marketing Sharmini. 

We covered everything from our financial runway to why we sometimes release “broken” software. We also pulled apart the network on a technical, commercial and social level, explaining our processes and why we do what we do. 

As we prepare for our launch, Mysterium’s mind is on few things: 

  • Keeping our node pool strong and diverse, with the right incentives to maintain network health and scalability
  • Plans for rewarding loyal and long-term users, including staking opportunities 
  • Preserving the utility, stability and liquidity of MYST via world-first micropayments architecture 
  • Testing, testing, testing 
  • Effective marketing to onboard new users and make as much noise as we can about this decentralized, permissionless VPN
  • And keeping our ultimate promise; delivering a platform where you can not only access privacy and anonymity on your own terms, but own it fully. 

Watch the recorded video and see for yourself what’s to come. We’re sure there are questions that might not have been asked, so please reach out to us on Discord or via our support. 

The Launch of Mysterium Network

Update: 13/08/2020 – See the following blog post to see how our token migration and launch processes are changing.

 

***

We are fast approaching the official launch of Mysterium Network. This will be the realisation of our founding whitepaper and the crowning of our world-first, peer to peer VPN. 

The past few years have been spent building technology from scratch. We had an idea, but no blueprint for it. This means solving riddles in a backwards way; we only know the answers, but not which questions to ask. 

But after three years of building, breaking, and questioning, it’s time to release Mysterium Network into the wild. 

Here we share our official launch timeline and breakdown how we’re taking Mysterium global.  

 

Read our blog about the role our native token MYST will play in keeping the whole network running, and its planned upgrade from an ERC20 to an ERC777 token. 

What is Mainnet?

Mysterium Network is currently running on its own testnet (has no real payments on the “live” blockchain). This BETA process has helped us to test our product in parallel network conditions and configurations. After a couple of years in this development stage, we have been able to refine, iterate and learn invaluable lessons along the way.

Now we’re ready to finally launch on the mainnet Ethereum. First, we will transition onto the Ethereum Goerli testnet to stress test our P2P payments. Once we’ve monitored and are satisfied with the results, our network will then plug into the mainnet (the “actual” blockchain) with the peer to peer payments system built into the protocol. 

How will the launch work?

The release on mainnet will happen in 3 stages, and during this time several network forks will occur. We understand that this will be difficult for node runners as it will create a temporary state where the app and nodes may run on different networks. This is an unfortunate and inevitable pain we must go through as a community. We will work to make this transition as smooth as possible for both node runners and users. 

Stage ONE (Middle of July): 

  • We will first issue some newly upgraded MYST (ERC777) token on Goerli testnet. We will also upgrade the payment system to prepare it for the Ethereum Mainnet launch. This will create the first network fork.
  • Following this, the ERC777 tokens will be deployed on Ethereum mainnet and token migration will begin for MYST ERC20 token holders. We are aiming for the end of July.

Stage TWO (Middle of August):

  • Mysterium payment system smart contracts will be deployed on Ethereum Mainnet. New discovery, transactor and Hermes services will also be deployed. This will cause the launch of a parallel network (beta net). Not all users will be required to switch into it. And our official dvpn and node apps will still be using testnet. 
  • On betanet transactions will be done on Ethereum mainnet but we will still be using MYSTT test token. No MYST token usage at this stage yet.
  • The Mysterium Node Pilot will not apply for betanet users, but it will be possible to convert MYSTT token into MYST tokens using our special “MiniDEX” smart contract. 

Stage THREE (Middle of September): 

  • We’ll release 1.0 version of nodes and mainnet ready dvpn apps which will begin using and accepting MYST token. This will introduce a 3rd network fork. There are no further forks planned or anticipated after this stage.
  • The Mysterium Referral program launches, bringing consumers and paid traffic into the network.

What changes for nodes?

During the second stage, the node registration process will be changed. 

Currently, users can plug in a Raspberry Pi, which is “found” by the host My.Mysterium.Network. Users turn their Pis into nodes and become a part of Mysterium Network. We will introduce a new onboarding flow. This includes setting a beneficiary/payout wallet during first node run; setting your staking amount to determine your settlement thresholds and maximum amount of tokens during one withdrawal; create your own password; set the price that you’d like to offer your VPN service. Only once the above has been set up, nodes can start providing their services.

We’ll be publishing more important details in the weeks ahead. In the meantime, join our Discord channel and download the app for Android, Windows or Mac to get a taste of the free version before we move to the P2P payments model.

Mysterium Node Runner settles claim in Germany

Permissionless networks come with regulatory grey zones. This is known. We are here to change an existing system. 

Mysterium Network is building an incentivised, permissionless network. When we first came together as a project team, we knew this day, and more of its kind would come. 

TOR project, a front runner in this the distributed internet space has faced its fair share of battles against systems of centralisation. A quick google search shows up specific cases against Tor exit nodes. You can see some examples here and here

Mysterium Node Runner settles claim in Germany

On 15-04-2020, a legal claim was presented against a Mysterium Node Runner in Germany. The claim was that someone was uploading copyrighted content through this node. While no file size was specified, a checksum of the file that had been uploaded was provided.

The Mysterium support team worked with the node runner to help him retrieve logs and investigate how many nodes were connected at a given timestamp. This information helped the node runner to prove there were other members in his “household”, i.e. network. 

Our understanding is that the case is now closed.

Mysterium Network’s ongoing commitment to Node Runners

As participants in a permissionless network, we as a community are committed to a free-er internet. 

We are happy to work with node runners to provide any information (within our means, we are after all a decentralised system) to help in cases like the one above. 

As technology providers, we will try our best to protect all actors within the network. In saying this, given the research and development phase of Mysterium Network, we cannot guarantee protection for Mysterium Node Runners.

We understand the need for a legal framework to help protect node runners and have prioritised this following our launch to mainnet. For now, we urge you to look at TOR tips for running an exit node as guidance.

We are also currently seeking guidance from industry bodies within the internet freedom landscape to help shape an industry standard for dVPN, so that we can work towards a long term solution to a known problem. 

We thank you for your commitment to the cause. 

Onward. 

Mysterium Network May 2020 Product Update

Mysterium Network is building a decentralised VPN. Our global network is open, permissionless and distributed. Last year we focused on finetuning our node software, and understanding dynamics in incentivised networks. This year, we’re balancing out the marketplace with focus on consumer applications. If you haven’t already, please make sure to download Mysterium VPN for MacOS and let us know what you think.

The past month at Mysterium has seen us ramp up efforts as we prepare for our summer mainnet launch. 

With our mainnet launch, we are making strides towards our goal of building a peer to peer incentivised system. During our launch, we will release Hermes protocol – micropayments infrastructure for dVPN – onto Ethereum blockchain. Hermes protocol is exciting for us, as it will power our network of nodes and allow end-users to pay nodes directly without us functioning as intermediaries. 

Hermes protocol is going to power a distributed, incentivised network of users and VPN service providers. We’re building it into the dVPN application so that the user journey is as seamless as possible. We’re putting the final touches on the technology, and will soon start making noise (with your help) to spread the word about Mysterium through a referral program. More news on this coming soon.

Some key updates from the development team:

Mysterium VPN is going to migrate to WireGuard protocol
As a protocol, WireGuard®️ has proved faster, more stable and easier to develop as the foundation for Mysterium. WireGuard®️ is an open-source software and communication protocol for VPNs, creating secure point-to-point connections. Step by step, we’re slowly migrating it as our main protocol. Our upcoming versions of Android, macOS and Windows apps are only going to use the WireGuard®️ protocol. More details about this development approach will be released soon.

Check out our new macOS desktop app
We just launched our macOS desktop app. This means anyone with a Mac computer or MacBook can use the Mysterium dVPN to power an anonymous and uncensored web experience. Read more about our dVPN for Mac

Watch this space for a reintroduction of our Windows application
We will soon be releasing the dVPN for Windows too, which is currently in BETA. This will mean Mysterium can be used with all computers operating Windows – roughly 80% of the world’s computers today. We hope this will help kickstart Mysterium’s global journey.

Updates to Node Software
New version of node v0.34 was released recently. This version has a swift and seamless identity registration feature which is optimised for onboarding new users. This is especially important for our mainnet release, as blockchain transactions could take up to one hour to be confirmed. With our new registration system, users will be able to start using our VPN service in a matter of seconds.

New graphic user interfaces (GUIs), coming your way
We’re working on a new design for our web user interface. We will be sharing the design mockups with our community to get their feedback and to develop the best dVPN experience in the space.

In our next update, we will be much closer to our transition from the Ethereum Görli Testnet to Ethereum blockchain. Stay tuned for exciting updates. If you are interested in participating, running a node, or generally have any questions, jump into our discord channel and speak directly with our core team. 

This summer, we’re excited to share with you Mysterium Network – a permissionless P2P network – three years in the making and the realisation of our founding whitepaper. 

In the meantime, try our free VPN for Android here and VPN for Mac here.

Introducing our decentralized VPN for Mac 🎉

Mysterium VPN app for Mac is now live.

This means anyone with a Mac computer or macbook can use the Mysterium dVPN to power an anonymous and uncensored web experience – all while rebuilding the web from the inside out.

Download the free VPN for Mac here.

Available for macOS versions 10.14+ and later

What is Mysterium VPN for Mac?

Mysterium dVPN is an anti-censorship, anti-surveillance tool. It is more similar to Tor network in its philosophy and infrastructure, but preserves the essential functions and ease of use of a VPN. You can easily connect to the Mysterium VPN and run it while browsing online, no matter where you are. This will protect yourself against cyberthreats and help you bypass firewalls and geoblocking. It’s free to install for a short time only, and its simple user interface helps you get started in minutes. 

Under the hood, Mysterium is very different to other VPNs for Mac. While regular VPNs connect you to servers owned or managed by businesses, our VPN is powered entirely by its users. Mysterium’s P2P, decentralized (distributed) network is made up of people all over the world who share their bandwidth and IP address with each other in exchange for crypto. So you can be in dVPN mode to use it, or in node mode to power it and earn. Note that you need to have a node set up to start earning in the network. You can learn how to become a node in our guide, and we’ve even made a dashboard for nodes which lets you track your earnings each day. 

Just like Tor, when you use the dVPN your encrypted traffic is sent throughout the network in an unrecognizable form. We also use various security protocols such as OpenVPN and WireGuard® to ensure the network is safe. The decentralized nature of our network means we can’t store logs centrally, even if we wanted to. 

What’s new with our VPN for Mac?

We added new features such as advanced filtering, auto-updates and a seamless onboarding experience. 

Advanced filtering allows you to select your connection type, country and even price. 

As with our Android app, you’ll be able to select from a dropdown menu of residential IP addresses located around the world. You can curate your VPN experience, unlocking content from countries based on your browsing needs.

The app also has an inbuilt in auto-update functionality, so you’ll always have the latest and best version. 

Our new onboarding process is fast and seamless, so you can register your identity (MystID) in a matter of seconds. Your identity is linked to a unique Ethereum address generated for you, where you can top up your MYSTT balance. MYSTT is our testnet version of our native MYST token. You can use MYSTT to activate the service and begin paying by the minute or amount of data transferred.

What’s coming next?

Mysterium wants to open up the internet to everyone, ensuring every web user has equal and secure access. We released our dVPN for Android last year, and have been working hard to make the Myst VPN compatible with all devices and systems. This new macOS release lays the foundation for our upcoming Windows version. Our user interface code is shared among platforms, so you’ll have the same experience across every device.

Discover our VPN for Mac

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